Class of 1992

Check back often as events will be added to the website frequently — right up until Homecoming weekend!

Cal Family Dinner

Friday 6 p.m.9 p.m.  

This is Friday night’s big event for all Bears! Alumni, parents, students, families, and friends will come together to experience the culinary culture of the Bay Area. We’ll celebrate classes in milestone reunions and introduce incoming Cal family members to our favorite traditions. Enjoy dinner and dessert al fresco from a wide variety of gourmet food trucks, entertainment from student performance groups, and a special greeting from Chancellor Carol T. Christ at 7 p.m.

$40 for adults; $35 for Cal students or kids age 5–17.

Registration also includes unlimited access to lectures, tours, open houses, and all the amenities available at Homecoming Headquarters.
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Other Events

Cal vs. Arizona Homecoming Football Game

Saturday
Time To Be Determined
 

Cheer on your Golden Bears in the company of friends and family. Football tickets are sold separately through Cal Athletics: visit calbears.com/code and enter the code HOMECOMING to receive a discount. The Class of 1967 has special seating for their 50th Reunion; call your class ticket representative at 510.642.2683 to purchase these seats.

For special requests, including ADA seating, please call 800.GO.BEARS and press “3” to speak to a Cal Athletics ticket representative. Please note that students with season tickets have their own section. Students wishing to sit with their families will need to purchase additional tickets.

Kickoff time will be determined by the PAC-12 Conference 6–12 days before the game.

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Bear Affair Tailgate BBQ

Saturday 10:30 a.m.1:30 p.m.  

Relax before the game at a traditional tailgate barbeque with special seating areas for each alumni class, Cal parents, and student group reunions. Meet up with your friends and family to get your blue and gold spirit ready for football, or to fuel up for your next lecture or tour. Don’t be shy about going for second helpings — they are included in the price! You’ll also have a chance to hear from Chancellor Carol T. Christ in a brief program at 11:45 a.m.

$35 per adult, $30 for Cal students or kids age 5–17.

Registration also includes unlimited access to lectures, tours, open houses, and all the amenities available at Homecoming Headquarters.
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Doe and Moffitt Libraries and Gardner Stacks Open House

Friday 8 a.m.5 p.m.  
Saturday 9 a.m.5 p.m.  
Sunday 1 p.m.5 p.m.  

Explore these libraries that have served the campus for more than 100 years. Be awed by grand spaces like the North Reading Room and Heyns Reading Room and delve into the exhibits of the Bernice Layne Brown Gallery. Plus get special access to the 52 miles of shelves in the Gardner Stacks, simply show your badge at the entrance.

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Fiat Yuks: Cal Student Humor, Then and Now

Friday 8 a.m.9 p.m.  
Saturday 9 a.m.5 p.m.  
Sunday 1 p.m.9 p.m.  

Let there be laughter! This exhibition features selections from UC Berkeley campus humor magazines, the yearbook, and other student publications. 

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Love Across the Global South: Popular Cinema Cultures of India and Africa

Friday 8 a.m.9 p.m.  
Saturday 9 a.m.5 p.m.  
Sunday 1 p.m.9 p.m.  

This exhibition takes the globalization of Bollywood as a starting point, looking at how the robust and organized Bollywood fan culture of Senegal, West Africa engages with, theorizes, and domesticates Indian popular culture — entering into dialogue with it and making it its own.

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Bears Lounge

Friday 9 a.m.5 p.m.  
Saturday 8 a.m.4 p.m.  

Relax, enjoy refreshments, and plan your day with the help of Cal staff and students.

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Cal Café

Friday 9 a.m.5 p.m.  
Saturday 8 a.m.football kickoff  

Stop by to celebrate Homecoming with complimentary refreshments and light snacks. We will have multiple giveaways as well as a raffle! The café will close on Saturday at football kickoff. Visit alumni.berkeley.edu for more information about the Cal Alumni Association.

Sponsored by: 
Cal Alumni Association
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Ecocity Berkeley at 30

Friday 9 a.m.5 p.m.  
Saturday 1 p.m.5 p.m.  
Sunday 1 p.m.10 p.m.  

The Environmental Design Library honors Richard Register’s groundbreaking 1985 publication Ecocity Berkeley. The exhibit exploring Register’s innovative, environmentally conscious city planning work can be found in the Raymond Lifchez and Judith Stronach Exhibition Cases.

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Feed the Bears Philanthropy Tent

Friday 9 a.m.5 p.m.  
Saturday 8 a.m.football kickoff  

UC Berkeley is one of the top public universities in the world because of the support of thousands of donors who believe in our mission. Stop by the tent to speak to staff and students about the impact that this essential funding has on our campus.

Members of the Charter Hill and Benjamin Ide Wheeler Societies and Berkeley Loyal: we will have a small giveaway for you, as thanks for your ongoing generosity! Berkeley Loyal (loyal.berkeley.edu) recognizes donors whose consistent giving fuels Berkeley’s excellence. The Charter Hill Society (charterhill.berkeley.edu) recognizes donors whose annual donations total $1,000 or more anywhere on campus. The Wheeler Society (planyourlegacy.berkeley.edu) recognizes individuals and families who provide philanthropic support to Berkeley through planned gifts. 

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Herstory: Chinese American Women, 165 Years of Struggle and Success

Friday 9 a.m.5 p.m.  
Saturday 1 p.m.6 p.m.  

Drawn from the personal collection of Dr. Chang C. Chen, Herstory features rare photographs and case descriptions of efforts by Chinese American women to gain legal standing in the U.S. Beginning in 1852, the exhibit documents women who fought for equal treatment in the eyes of the law and for citizenship and immigration rights. Far from being passive, Chinese American women have a legacy of resistance, from advocating for the right to public education to fighting against discriminatory detention and deportation. At a time of public debate around immigration and belonging in the United States, this exhibit shines a light on the “herstory” of brave women who fought for their place in America and the place of future generations.

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Homecoming Headquarters

Friday 9 a.m.8 p.m.  
Saturday 8 a.m.4 p.m.  

Stop in at Homecoming Headquarters when you first arrive to pick up your name tag. This badge gives you access to lectures, museums, libraries, tours, golf cart service, and all of the amenities at Homecoming Headquarters. 

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Residence Hall Student Banner Contest

Friday 9 a.m.5 p.m.  

Vote for your favorite banner and help one unit earn bragging rights! Students from each residence hall will design and create a banner to capture their building’s spirit. This second year contest is the start of a new campus tradition you can be part of too.

Sponsored by: 
Residence Hall Assembly and Residential Education
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The Environmental Design Library Open House

Friday 9 a.m.5 p.m.  
Saturday 1 p.m.5 p.m.  
Sunday 1 p.m.10 p.m.  

The Environmental Design Library has the largest collection west of the Mississippi for architecture, landscape architecture, and urban planning. Explore a wide array of resources including rare publications, hand-made artists’ books, and more.

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The Paul Kendel Fonoroff Collection

Friday 9 a.m.5 p.m.  
Saturday 10 a.m.5 p.m.  
Sunday 12 p.m.8 p.m.  

The C. V. Starr East Asian Library’s Fonoroff exhibition displays periodicals, posters, and ephemera from the newly acquired collection of Chinese film studies materials — the largest of its kind in North America. View materials documenting the development of the film and entertainment industry of greater China from its inception in the early decades of the twentieth century to the 1990s.

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Campanile Open House

Friday 10 a.m.3:45 p.m.  
Saturday 10 a.m.4:45 p.m.  
Sunday 10 a.m.1:30 p.m.  
Sunday 3 p.m.4:45 p.m.  

Get a spectacular, sprawling view of the Bay Area from the observation platform of Sather Tower, also known as the Campanile. One of UC Berkeley’s most beloved and well-known symbols, the Campanile is the third tallest bell and clock tower in the world, visible for miles at a height of 307 feet. Enjoy daily carillon concerts at 7:50 a.m., 12 p.m., and 6 p.m.

Visitor Services has waived admission for Homecoming guests — simply show your badge at the entrance.

Sponsored by: 
Visitor Services
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Campus Walking Tour

Friday 10 a.m.11:30 a.m.  
Friday 1 p.m.2:30 p.m.  
Saturday 10 a.m.11:30 a.m.  
Saturday 11 a.m.12:30 p.m.  
Saturday 1 p.m.2:30 p.m.  

Learn about campus architecture, history, and university life during a 90-minute walking tour led by a knowledgeable campus ambassador.

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The Summer of Love

Friday 10 a.m.4 p.m.  
Saturday 10 a.m.4 p.m.  

This exhibition marks the 50th anniversary of the Summer of Love through the Bancroft Library’s rare and unique collections. Presented are images from the Bay Area alternative press, psychedelic rock posters and mailers, documentary photographs of the Haight-Ashbury scene and major rock concerts, and material from the personal papers of author Joan Didion and poet Michael McClure.

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Understanding Your Vision Problems: Truths and Misconceptions

Friday 10 a.m.11 a.m.  

People have developed explanations, myths, and superstitions about vision problems for millennia. This lecture will reveal the true causes of vision problems, answering such questions as, “Why am I nearsighted?” and “Why do my parents need reading glasses?” Other topics explored include: “Are carrots really good for my eyes?”; “Is it bad to read in the dark or sit too close to the television?”; and “Can eye exercises help my vision?”

Speaker(s): 
Patsy L. Harvey
Clinical Professor; School of Optometry

Patsy L. Harvey received her O.D. and M.P.H. from UC Berkeley. She currently teaches at the School of Optometry, including courses on myths, mysteries, and discoveries in medicine; systemic diseases; vision impairments; and geriatrics. 

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Viruses Reveal the Secrets of Biology

Friday 10 a.m.11 a.m.  

Viruses are master manipulators, and those that persist for long periods of time are extraordinarily well-adapted to coexisting with their human and animal hosts. This lecture will explore how these minute agents are able to take control of a highly sophisticated cell with only a small set of genetic instructions. We will discuss what they need in order to multiply, and how studying them provides new insights into the inner workings of our own cells.

Speaker(s): 
Britt Glaunsinger
Associate Professor and Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator, Department of Plant and Microbial Biology

Britt Glaunsinger leads a biomedical research laboratory that investigates how viruses, particularly those that persist in an infected individual for long periods of time, interact with the infected cell in order to multiply. The primary focus of her research is to understand how herpes viruses hijack or redesign components of the host cell to express their genes. Glaunsinger’s research has been recognized by awards from the Burroughs Wellcome Foundation, the W.M. Keck Foundation, the UC Berkeley Prytanean Women’s Honor Society, and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. She was named a 2015 UC Berkeley Miller Professor and the 2017 UC Berkeley Class of 1963 Endowed Chair. More information about her research group can be found at glaunsingerlab.berkeley.edu.

Sponsored by: 
Prytanean Women's Honor Society
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¡Viva la Fiesta! Mexican Traditions of Celebration

Friday 10 a.m.4 p.m.  
Saturday 10 a.m.4 p.m.  

This exhibition explores many traditional Mexican celebrations: weddings and birthdays, the Day of the Dead, the Feast of Our Lady of Guadalupe, Las Posadas, and many more. 

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Class of 1957 60th Reunion Lunch

Friday 11 a.m.2 p.m.  

Catch up on life since Cal and revisit favorite memories at the 11 a.m. social hour and noon luncheon. Special guests include Chancellor Carol T. Christ, Oski, the Cal Band, Men’s Octet, and California Golden Overtones. 

$57 per person. Parking is available in the Lower Sproul garage for an additional $15.

Registration also includes unlimited access to lectures, tours, open houses, and all the amenities available at Homecoming Headquarters.
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Hearst Museum Open House

Friday 11 a.m.5 p.m.  
Saturday 10 a.m.6 p.m.  
Sunday 11 a.m.5 p.m.  

The recently reopened Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology is excited to welcome Cal alumni, parents, and friends! Stop by anytime to explore the inaugural exhibit, “People Made These Things: Connecting with the Makers of Our World,” or join a guided tour at 11 a.m. or 4 p.m. Virtually explore archaeological sites around the world through the interactive CAVE kiosk or take a break and chill out in the Lounge of Wondrous Anthropological Discoveries.

The Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology has waived admission for Homecoming guests — simply show your badge at the entrance.

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The Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life Open House

Friday 11 a.m.4 p.m.  

View four exhibitions highlighting the treasures of one of the world’s preeminent Jewish collections in a university setting. The first, “The Invisible Museum: History and Memory of Morocco,” highlights our considerable Moroccan collection, including many objects never before seen in public. “Sketching Fiddler: Set Designs by Mentor Huebner” displays original sketches and storyboard drawings created by Huebner for the 1971 feature film Fiddler on the Roof along with a small selection of set photographs. In the auditorium of The Magnes, “The Worlds of Arthur Szyk” displays high-resolution images of select collection items from The Taube Family Arthur Szyk Collection. Continuing from the spring semester is “Power of Attention: Magic & Meditation in Hebrew Shiviti Manuscript Art,” which showcases a selection from manuscripts, books, amulets, and textiles that center on the graphic representation of God’s ineffable four-letter Hebrew name — a window into the more mystical side of Judaism. 

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UC Botanical Garden Tour

Saturday 11 a.m.  
Saturday 12:30 p.m.  
Saturday 1:30 p.m.  
Sunday 11 a.m.  
Sunday 12:30 p.m.  
Sunday 1:30 p.m.  
Friday 11 a.m.  
Friday 12:30 p.m.  
Friday 1:30 p.m.  

Explore the incredible diversity of plant habitats from six continents — redwood forests, deserts, tropical forests, wetlands — at the UC Botanical Garden. Feast your senses on special collections of orchids and carnivorous plants, the Garden of Old Roses, and spectacular views of the Golden Gate Bridge. You can take a docent-led tour or visit any time during open hours for a self-guided stroll. We strongly recommend visiting on Friday or Sunday, as access on Saturday can be severely limited due to football road closures. 

The UC Berkeley Botanical Garden has waived admission for Homecoming guests — simply show your badge at the entrance.

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UC Museum of Paleontology Tour

Friday 11 a.m.12 p.m.  

The University of California Museum of Paleontology contains more than five million specimens: invertebrate fossils and microfossils, ancient North American mammals, crocodilians, turtles, marine reptiles, and even massive dinosaurs who once roamed Montana and California. In this exclusive, behind-the-scenes tour, learn why these collections are critical to understanding global change past and present.

Limited to 25 people on a first-come, first served basis.

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University Police Meet-and-Greet

Friday 11 a.m.1 p.m.  

Come to the south side of Sproul Hall for a meet-and-greet session with the University Police (UCPD). UCPD handles all patrol, investigation, crime prevention education, emergency preparedness, and related duties for the campus community. Discuss safety and security with officers and learn about their services and specialized units such as the tactical, canine, and bomb teams.

Sponsored by: 
UCPD
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Earthquake Warning: New Technology to Reduce This Critical Threat

Friday 11:30 a.m.12:30 p.m.  

Earthquakes pose a critical threat to people and infrastructure in the San Francisco Bay Area and in many other parts of the world. By combining advances in earthquake science with new communication capabilities, it is now possible to provide warning of coming earthquake shaking. Warnings of a few seconds to a few minutes can be used to take cover under a sturdy table, to slow and stop trains, and to isolate hazardous machinery and chemicals at work — and to thereby reduce damage and injuries. We will discuss how the seismic network in California is now generating warnings and the path to public alerts (ShakeAlert.org). We will also demonstrate a new technology that uses smartphones to detect earthquakes that could provide warning around the world (Myshake.berkeley.edu).

Speaker(s): 
Richard Allen
Professor and Chair, Earth and Planetary Science and Director, Seismology Lab

Richard Allen is an expert in earthquake alerting systems, developing methodologies to detect earthquakes and issue warnings prior to shaking and tsunamis. His group uses seismic and GPS sensing networks and is experimenting with the use of a global smartphone network called MyShake. Testing of the ShakeAlert warning system for the U.S. west coast is currently underway. Allen’s group also uses geophysical sensing networks to image the internal 3D structure of the Earth and constrain the driving forces responsible for earthquakes, volcanoes, and other deformation of the Earth’s surface. His research has been featured in Science, Nature, Scientific American, the New York Times, and dozens of other media outlets around the world. He has a B.A. from Cambridge, a Ph.D. from Princeton, and was a postdoctoral fellow at Caltech.

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The Gulf States: Vive La Revolution or Vive La Counterrevolution?

Friday 11:30 a.m.12:30 p.m.  

The Gulf states seemed impermeable to the 2011 Arab uprisings but saw regional developments as both threat and opportunity. Bartu will discuss the Gulf states and Saudi Arabia, Oman, UAE, and Qatar in particular and their roles in an ongoing struggle for the heart and soul of a region. 

Speaker(s): 
Peter Bartu
Lecturer, International and Area Studies

Peter Bartu teaches political transitions in the Middle East and North Africa, the Gulf states, and international organizations and global governance. In 2011 he was a member of the UN’s stand-by mediation team and worked in Benghazi and Tripoli during the Libyan revolution among other assignments in Djibouti, Iraq, and Malawi. In 2008–09 he led a team that produced a seminal 500-page report on the disputed internal boundaries between the Arabs and the Kurds in Iraq, including Kirkuk. From 2001–03 he was a political advisor to the UN special coordinator for the Middle East peace process, based in Jerusalem. Bartu has worked as a foreign policy advisor in the Australian Prime Minister’s Department and held other appointments with the UN in East Timor in 1999 and in Cambodia from 1991–93. He has a Ph.D. in history from Monash University.

Sponsored by: 
Center for Middle Eastern Studies
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Travels, Travails, and Triumphs 1962–2017

Friday 11:30 a.m.12:45 p.m.  

Where have we been? Where are we headed? What successes and challenges have we faced? Come hear four illustrious and thoughtful members of our class reflect on their years since graduating. Attorneys, a doctor, a vintner, and authors share some of their most memorable, difficult, and rewarding experiences since Cal. Our permanent class president, Brian Van Camp, will channel his best “Dave Garroway/Charlie Rose,” for the interview. It promises to be a fun peek into the last 55 years of four fascinating classmates.

Speaker(s): 
Stu Gordon '62, J.D. '65

Stu Gordon is founding partner of Gordon & Rees, one of California’s leading litigation law firms. He is also a “dead-serious restaurateur,” investing in dozens of upscale California eateries, a Builder of Berkeley, and a Bay Area community volunteer par excellence.  

H. William Harlan '62

Bill Harlan owns and developed Harlan Estate and Bond Wines, for which he has received many outstanding awards, as well as Meadowood Resort in Napa Valley.

Darlene Lanka '62

Dr. Darlene Lanka a retired OB-GYN, an author, and advocate for women’s health issues. She graduated from UCSF medical school and she was the first female OB-GYN resident at Kaiser-Permanente San Francisco. After completing her residency, Lanka became the first female OB-GYN at Kaiser-Permanente Medical Center in Walnut Creek.

Brian Van Camp '62, J.D. '65

Brian Van Camp is a former Superior Court Judge and current arbitrator, recipient of the Cal Alumni Association’s Award of Excellence in 2000, and an occasional clarinet and tenor sax player.

Geoff Wong '62

Geoff Wong is an attorney in Sacramento with his J.D. from the McGeorge School of Law at University of the Pacific. He is the author of two published books about Cal A Golden State of Mind and Golden Daze.  Wong is a community activist, third generation Cal alumnus, volunteer, and a one-time “River Boat Captain!”

Sponsored by: 
Class of 1962
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Cal Spirit Noon Rally

Friday 12 p.m.1 p.m.  

Rev up your blue and gold pride at this lively, all-campus event featuring all of your favorite Cal Spirit groups!

Sponsored by: 
UC Rally Committee
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Essig Museum of Entomology Open House

Friday 12 p.m.6 p.m.  
Saturday 10 a.m.6 p.m.  

Don’t miss this unique chance to view the weird and wonderful world of insects and spiders at the Essig Museum, home to more than five million insect specimens collected over 100 years’ time from western North America, Hawaii, Mexico, Costa Rica, and Tahiti. Learn how specimens are used to discover new species, decipher evolutionary questions, and understand where and how these creatures live.

 
 
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The Role of the California Alumni Association Today

Friday 12:30 p.m.1:30 p.m.  

Learn about the role of CAA as it pertains to students, including the programs and networks that are being introduced to foster community and relationships between students and alumni. The importance of creating and fostering networks, both for students and alumni, cannot be stressed enough. Using existing programs and new technology to structure these connections among alumni and students provides opportunity and insight for all Cal Bears.

Speaker(s): 
Clothilde V. Hewlett ’76, J.D. ’79
Executive Director, California Alumni Association

Clothilde V. Hewlett was a partner in the national law firm Nossaman LLP and, prior to that, was a partner in the global law firm K&L Gates LLP. As a partner, she focused on government contracting, crisis management, major appropriations, policy analysis, and diversity. She is a specialist in public policy, was a registered state and federal lobbyist, and has served under three different governors of California. She has served as interim director of the State of California’s Department of General Services and undersecretary of the State and Consumer Services Agency for the State of California, among other posts.

Sponsored by: 
Order of the Golden Bear
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Celebrating the Class of 1954 Chair

Friday 12:45 p.m.1:15 p.m.  

Join the Class of 1954 as they honor past chairs and welcome Richard Allen, Professor and Chair of Earth and Planetary Science, as the new recipient of the Class of 1954 Endowed Chair. Professor Allen’s lecture “Earthquake Warning: New Technology to Reduce This Critical Threat” will take place from 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. in the same location.

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Museum of Vertebrate Zoology Tour

Friday 1 p.m.2 p.m.  

Visit one of the largest university-based collections of tetrapod vertebrates in the world, including about 700,000 superb bird, mammal, reptile, and amphibian specimens from around the globe. You’ll see rare and extinct animal specimens and learn about research projects aimed at answering fundamental questions about evolution and conservation.

Limited to 25 people on a first-come, first-served basis.

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The Homecoming of Letters & Science: A Milestone for Berkeley’s Liberal Arts Community

Friday 1 p.m.2 p.m.  

The College of Letters & Science is the oldest academic unit on the Berkeley campus, and confers more than 70 percent of undergraduate degrees every year. What better time than Homecoming to celebrate the creation of an official home for the college? Join Chancellor Carol T. Christ and our community of L&S deans, faculty, students, and alumni as we unveil the new front door to the College of Letters & Science in Dwinelle Hall and adjacent Durant Hall on the historic plaza at the east entrance to Dwinelle. Refreshments will be served.

Sponsored by: 
College of Letters & Science
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Blown Across the Sea: Glass Along the Maritime Silk Road

Friday 2 p.m.3 p.m.  

This lecture will highlight the results of underwater surveys of a 2,000-year-old shipwreck uncovered off the coast of the small fishing village of Godavaya, Sri Lanka. The ship’s cargo of glass ingots, among other objects, will be the starting point of a discussion on the movement of glass raw materials and finished objects along the intertwined maritime and overland trading networks commonly referred to as the Silk Road. In particular, the talk will focus on the implications of this evidence for archaeological analysis of early patterns of globalization. 

Speaker(s): 
Sanjyot Mehendale Ph.D. '97
Chair, Tang Center for Silk Road Studies

Sanjyot Mehendale teaches on Central Asia in the department of Near Eastern Studies. An archaeologist specializing in cross-cultural connections of early Common Era Eurasia, her Ph.D. work focusing on the archaeology of Eurasian trading networks. Recent research and writing projects have been supported by various grants including a fellowship from the National Endowment for the Humanities to create a publicly accessible database of the ivory and bone carvings uncovered at the early Common Era Kushan site at Bagram (Afghanistan). In 2007, Mehendale became a consultant to the National Geographic Society and the San Francisco Asian Art Museum to help structure the Afghanistan: Hidden Treasures from the National Museum, Kabul exhibition and contribute to the accompanying catalogue. Since 1996, she has conducted archaeological research in Sri Lanka, looking into first millennium CE maritime connections across the Indian Ocean.

Sponsored by: 
Tang Center for Silk Road Studies
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Cutting Edge and Cutting Costs

Friday 2 p.m.3 p.m.  

New University Library initiatives explore emerging research technologies and new programs to cut textbook costs for Berkeley students. Find out what the newly renovated fourth and fifth floors of Moffitt have to offer and learn about the library’s role in digital literacy, makerspaces, student technology services, and open educational resources!

Speaker(s): 
Jean Ferguson
Learning and Research Communities Librarian

Jean Ferguson connects with students and programs at UC Berkeley to advise on new library spaces and services. Prior to joining Cal in 2015, she spent 10 years at the Duke University Libraries as head of research service, helping to create The Edge, a center for data, digital humanities, and digital scholarship. Ferguson has an M.S. in library science from the University of North Carolina, an M.S. in information science from Ball State University, and a B.A. from Augustana College.

Cody Hennesy
E-Learning and Information Studies Librarian

Cody Hennesy leads the UC Berkeley Library’s digital literacy initiative, wherein he focuses on the intersection of emerging technologies, scholarly research methods, and student learning. Prior to his five years at Cal, he worked as the systems and services librarian at California College of the Arts in Oakland. He has an M.L.I.S. from San Jose State University.

Rachael G. Samberg
Scholarly Communication Officer, UC Berkeley Library

Rachel Samberg is responsible for copyright and other IP and licensing rights education for Berkeley scholars, and advises about scholarly publishing options, open access publishing, and research impact. She is also a national presenter for the Association of College and Research Libraries’ workshop series “Scholarly Communication: From Understanding to Engagement.”  She has a B.S. from Tufts University, a J.D. from Duke University School of Law, and an M.L.I.S. from the University of Washington. 

Sponsored by: 
University Library
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How Dogs Make Us Human

Friday 2 p.m.3 p.m.  

This richly illustrated lecture focuses on the very long history of our species’ relationship with our best friends. Much of the talk will be devoted to dogs in the great art of the Western world and especially to the interests of artists in the dog’s gaze — how dogs look. The broader context is the co-evolutionary development of dogs and human and, more specifically, Darwin’s intense interest in canines generally and in his beloved Polly in particular. Cats will not be entirely ignored.

Speaker(s): 
Thomas W. Laqueur
Helen Fawcett Distinguished Professor of History

Thomas Laqueur began teaching at Berkeley in 1973 after studying at Swarthmore, Princeton, and Oxford. A specialist in the cultural history of modern Europe, Laqueur is a founding editor of the journal Representations and a former director of the Doreen B. Townsend Center of the Humanities. His work — translated into fifteen languages — has focused on the history of popular religion and literacy; on the history the body, alive and dead; and on the history of death and memory. His most recent book, The Work of the Dead: A Cultural History of Moral Remains, was published by Princeton in 2015. He also writes regularly for the London Review of Books, the Threepenny Review, The Guardian, and other journals. In 2007, Laqueur won a $1.5 million Mellon Distinguished Humanist Award.

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Mandarin-Language Campus Walking Tour

Friday 2 p.m.3:30 p.m.  
Saturday 9:30 a.m.11 a.m.  

Learn about campus architecture, history, and university life during a 90-minute walking tour with a knowledgeable, Mandarin-speaking campus ambassador.

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Origins of the Frontier and American Western Myth

Friday 2 p.m.3 p.m.  

The American frontier and the Old West have been indelible elements of American culture, history, and even politics. But how did the concept of “The Western” emerge and why has it endured? This presentation will take the audience on a journey to answer those questions, and to learn how the Western still impacts American society — all accompanied by images of America’s past and present.

Speaker(s): 
Nadesan Permaul B.A. ’72, M.A. ’73, Ph.D. ’90
Adjunct Faculty, Political Science and Rhetoric

Nadesan Permaul received his B.A., M.A., and Ph.D. at Berkeley in political science. He retired as an administrator at Berkeley after a 34-year-career. Permaul has taught in political science, rhetoric, and sociology over the course of 25 years with a focus on American culture, history, and politics. He is a past president of the Cal Alumni Association, having served from 2003–05.

Sponsored by: 
Class of 1972
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Spanish-Language Campus Walking Tour

Friday 2 p.m.3:30 p.m.  
Saturday 9:30 a.m.11 a.m.  

Learn about campus architecture, history, and university life during a 90-minute walking tour with a knowledgeable, Spanish-speaking student ambassador.

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Walking Tour of Strawberry Creek

Friday 2 p.m.3:30 p.m.  

The UC Berkeley campus is not just a place of higher learning — it’s also a public open space with beautiful natural features. Join environmental protection specialists on a walking tour to learn about the history and ecosystem of Strawberry Creek, which flows through campus from top to bottom. 

Sponsored by: 
Office of Environmental Health & Safety and the Strawberry Creek Restoration Program
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History Walking Tour

Friday 3 p.m.4:30 p.m.  

Take a fun, easy walking tour with one of UC Berkeley’s most revered campus historians: Peter S. Van Houten ’56, M.A. ’62, Ed. D. ’73. Over the course of 60-plus years on campus as a student and then administrator, Van Houten has developed an encyclopedic knowledge of memorable people, buildings, events, and traditions. Gain a special perspective and “meet” some important historical figures from Cal’s fascinating past.

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Berkeley Connect: The Magic of Mentoring

Friday 3:30 p.m.4:30 p.m.  

A large research university like UC Berkeley can be an amazing place to get an undergraduate education; it can also feel impersonal and overwhelming. Seven years ago, Berkeley set out to address this problem by establishing a pioneering mentoring program called Berkeley Connect, and the results have been astounding. Learn how this mentoring model is transforming the undergraduate experience by increasing the confidence and sense of belonging of thousands of students each semester.

Speaker(s): 
Maura Nolan
Associate Professor of English and Director, Berkeley Connect

Maura Nolan is the founding director of the Berkeley Connect mentoring program, began in 2010 as a pilot project in the English department and now serving students across the university. A scholar of late medieval English literature, Nolan is the author of John Lydgate and the Making of Public Culture (Cambridge University Press, 2005). Prior to joining the Berkeley faculty in 2005, she taught at the University of Notre Dame.

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Free Speech: Status and Solutions

Friday 3:30 p.m.5 p.m.  

The Class of 1967 Symposium will examine the past and future of the Free Speech Movement on campus. Explore what has happened in the 50 years since the birth of the movement from alumni who were on campus at the time and from faculty experts.

Sponsored by: 
Class of 1967
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Special MENA Salon: The Middle East in 1982

Friday 3:30 p.m.4:30 p.m.  

Every Friday during the semester, the Center for Middle Eastern Studies hosts an informal coffee hour and guided discussion about current events in the Middle East and North Africa, open to all and free of charge. In honor of the 35th reunion of the Class of ’82, we will convene to look back at the events and repercussions of this critical period in the region’s history. Join faculty, students, and members of the community to discuss the Israeli invasion of Lebanon, the aftermath of the Iranian Revolution, the Iran-Iraq War, the early years of Reagan’s foreign policy, and more.

Speaker(s): 
Emily Gottreich '89
Chair of Center for Middle Eastern Studies

Emily Gottreich is the chair of the Center for Middle Eastern Studies, associate adjunct professor of history and international and area studies, and chair of the undergraduate major in Middle Eastern studies at UC Berkeley. Between 2009 and 2013 she served as president of the American Institute for Maghrib Studies. Gottreich received a Ph.D. in history and Middle Eastern studies from Harvard in 1999, an M.A. in Middle Eastern studies from Harvard in 1992, and a B.A. in Middle Eastern studies from Berkeley in 1989. Her research focuses on Moroccan Jewish history and Muslim-Jewish relations in broader Arab-Islamic contexts.

Julia Choucair-Vizoso
Vice Chair of Center for Middle Eastern Studies

Julia Choucair-Vizoso received a Ph.D. in political science from Yale in 2016, and an M.A. in Arab studies and a B.S. in foreign service from Georgetown in 2004. She was previously editor-in-chief and associate at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace in Washington, D.C.  She studies comparative politics with interests in nondemocratic institutions, network theory, and the contemporary Middle East.

Sponsored by: 
Center for Middle Eastern Studies & Class of 1982
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The Next Generation of 3D Printing and Advanced Manufacturing

Friday 3:30 p.m.4:30 p.m.  

This presentation will introduce simulation technologies being developed for new additive manufacturing processes such as 3D printing — technology still in its infancy, yet potentially crucial to the goals of several industrialized countries. Within the last decade, the economic importance of advanced manufacturing has come to the forefront, with the objective of developing superior products — such as surface structures and coatings — that can be made at lower overall cost. This session will demonstrate the advanced modeling and computation required to make such futuristic manufacturing a reality.

Speaker(s): 
Tarek Zohdi
Chancellor's Professor of Mechanical Engineering, Will C. Hall Endowed Chair, Computational and Data Science and Engineering Program Chair

Tarek I. Zohdi received his Ph.D. in 1997 in computational and applied mathematics from the University of Texas at Austin and his habilitation in general mechanics from the Gottfried Leibniz University of Hannover in 2002. His main research interests are in computational approaches for advanced manufacturing and material design. He has published over 140 archival refereed journal papers and five books. He has been the recipient of many awards, including the Zienkiewicz Prize and Medal in 2000, awarded once every two years to one post-graduate researcher under the age of 35 for research which contributes most to the field of numerical methods in engineering; and the 2003 Junior Achievement Award of the American Academy of Mechanics. He was elected president of the of the United Stated Association for Computational Mechanics in 2012, and served from 2012 to 2014. 

Sponsored by: 
Class of 1977
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There Goes the Neighborhood: The Challenge of American Immigration

Friday 3:30 p.m.4:30 p.m.  

This conversation will take on the state of American immigrant integration in the 21st century: beyond fiery debates online, in the media, and on the political stage over immigration, ordinary people in communities across the United States confront this integration daily. Some deal with incorporating newcomers into their communities; others are adjusting to life in a new country. What works and where are the challenges we must confront? Research shows significant progress in integration over time and across generations, whether we examine income, education, or English language ability. We also find some problems: immigrants are healthier than those born in the United States and are less likely to commit crimes, but these benefits disappear with their US-born children. As we grapple with the reality of immigration and the changing nature of American identity, how can we build on the best of American values and immigrants’ promise? 

Speaker(s): 
Irene Bloemraad
Professor of Sociology, Co-founder of the Berkeley Interdisciplinary Migration Initiative

Irene Bloemraad’s research examines how immigrants become incorporated into the political and civic life of their adopted countries and the consequences of their presence for politics and understandings of citizenship. Her workhas been published in journals spanning sociology, political science, history, and ethnic/migration studies. She is the author or co-editor of the Oxford Handbook of Citizenship, Rallying for Immigrant Rights, Civic Hopes and Political Realities, and Becoming a Citizen: Incorporating Immigrants and Refugees in the United States and Canada. In 2014 and 2015, Bloemraad served as a member of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences committee reporting on the integration of immigrants into U.S. society.  She believes that excellence in research and teaching go hand-in-hand and is the proud recipient of multiple Cal teaching and mentorship awards.

Ali Noorani ’96
Executive Director of the National Immigration Forum

Ali Noorani leads the National Immigration Forum, an advocacy organization promoting the value of immigrants and immigration. Growing up in California as the son of Pakistani immigrants, he quickly learned how to forge alliances among people of wide-ranging backgrounds, a skill that has served him well as one of the nation’s most innovative coalition builders. Noorani is a lifetime member of the Council on Foreign Relations, holds an M.P.H. from Boston University and is a B.A. from Cal. He lives in Washington, D.C., and is the author of There Goes the Neighborhood: How Communities Overcome Prejudice and Meet the Challenge of American Immigration.

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Walking Tour of the Berkeley Bears

Friday 3:30 p.m.5 p.m.  

Bears are everywhere you look at Berkeley, and that’s not just the students! There are more than 25 statues and other artworks on and around campus representing our beloved mascot. Join a campus ambassador for this fun walking tour of the ursine representations that abound.

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2017 Volunteer Awards Ceremony and Reception

Friday 5 p.m.7 p.m.  

Join us as we congratulate and celebrate the recipients of the 2017 Volunteer Awards: outstanding alumni, parents, and friends who provide selfless contributions of time and effort to the Berkeley community. We’re proud to present these honors — the Sather Gate Young Volunteer Award, the Spirit of 1868 Volunteer Award, and the Loyal Company Outstanding Volunteer Group Award — to these dedicated campus friends. For more information on the awards, please visit awards.berkeley.edu/volunteer-awards.

Sponsored by: 
Cal Alumni Association and UC Berkeley Foundation Board of Trustees
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A Universe of Universes? Reflections on Life and the Cosmos

Friday 5 p.m.6 p.m.  

Many scientists now think that there might be more than a single universe. Our universe may be just one example in a far larger “multiverse,” but an unusually complex one that is conducive to the existence of life. Come learn about the relevant lines of reasoning and their profound implications.
 

Speaker(s): 
Alex Filippenko
Professor of Astronomy

Alex Filippenko is one of the world’s most highly cited astronomers and the only person to have served on both teams that simultaneously discovered the Nobel-worthy accelerating expansion of the universe. Voted UC Berkeley’s “Best Professor” a record nine times, he appears frequently on TV documentaries and is addicted to observing total solar eclipses throughout the globe (16 so far).

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Class of 1962 55th Reunion Dinner

Friday 5 p.m.  

Celebrate your 55th reunion with a cocktail hour on the patio overlooking Faculty Glade, followed by a three-course dinner inside. Hear from our new Chancellor Carol T. Christ, listen to the Cal Band, and join Head Yell Leader George Goldberg in singing Cal Fight songs!

For more information, contact Caroline Allum at 510.643.6428 or email classof1962@berkeley.edu.

$150 per person.

Registration also includes unlimited access to lectures, tours, open houses, and all the amenities available at Homecoming Headquarters.
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Cal Family Dinner

Friday 6 p.m.9 p.m.  

This is Friday night’s big event for all Bears! Alumni, parents, students, families, and friends will come together to experience the culinary culture of the Bay Area. We’ll celebrate classes in milestone reunions and introduce incoming Cal family members to our favorite traditions. Enjoy dinner and dessert al fresco from a wide variety of gourmet food trucks, entertainment from student performance groups, and a special greeting from Chancellor Carol T. Christ at 7 p.m.

$40 for adults; $35 for Cal students or kids age 5–17.

Registration also includes unlimited access to lectures, tours, open houses, and all the amenities available at Homecoming Headquarters.
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Women's Field Hockey vs. UC Davis

Friday 6 p.m.7:30 p.m.  

Cheer on the Golden Bears as they take on the Aggies from UC Davis.

Free to the public.

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Class of 1967 50th Reunion Dinner

Friday 6:30 p.m.10 p.m.  

Enjoy cocktails with your classmates followed by dinner at the base of the beautiful Campanile. Special guests include our new Chancellor Carol T. Christ, the Cal Band, and more.

$125 per person. Valet parking is available for $30.

Registration also includes unlimited access to lectures, tours, open houses, and all the amenities available at Homecoming Headquarters.
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Women's Volleyball vs. Washington State

Friday 7 p.m.8:30 p.m.  

The Golden Bears battle the Washington State Cougars in women’s volleyball. 

$10 per adult, $5 per youth or senior, free for Cal students with ID

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Homecoming Rally

Friday 8 p.m.9:30 p.m.  

A great event for parents, alumni, and students alike! Combining the classic tradition and spirit that all Golden Bears love with the talent and diversity of today’s student body, this rally — featuring Cal Band, Dance, and Cheer, along with the best student a cappella and dance groups on campus — is a must-see show!

Sponsored by: 
UC Rally Committee
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California's Native Languages: History and Revival

Saturday 9 a.m.10 a.m.  

In this lecture we will discuss the unique language profile of California, whose 90 or more Native languages belong to more than a dozen different language families. UC Berkeley researchers have played a central role in documenting these languages, even as Europeans have decimated their communities and European languages have replaced them in daily usage. Language restoration is an active effort throughout our state, and documentation in Berkeley archives can be used in this effort.

Speaker(s): 
Andrew Garrett
Professor of Linguistics and Nadine M. Tang & Bruce L. Smith Professor of Cross-Cultural Social Sciences

Andrew Garrett received his Ph.D. from Harvard in 1990 and has taught at Berkeley, Stanford, and the University of Texas at Austin. His research concerns language change and linguistic reconstruction, and the documentation and revitalization of Native languages of California, especially the Karuk and Yurok languages.

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College of Environmental Design Welcome Reception

Saturday 9 a.m.9:30 a.m.  

Start your day on our newly renovated plaza with coffee and pastries from our recently opened café Rice & Bones, headed by renowned chef (and CED attendee) Charles Phan of San Francisco’s Slanted Door.

Please register for this event ced.berkeley.edu/events-media/events/college-of-environmental-design-open-house.

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Differences in Noise Pollution Across the United States

Saturday 9 a.m.10 a.m.  

Noise can trigger the sympathetic nervous system, resulting in the release of stress hormones. Research has linked nighttime noise, in particular, to sleep disturbance, impaired cognitive performance, hypertension, type 2 diabetes, and adverse birth outcomes. No one has described the burden of environmental noise in the U.S. since the 1980s. In a new study, we found substantial differences in noise exposure along racial and socioeconomic lines nationwide.

Speaker(s): 
Joan Casey
Postdoctoral scholar, School of Public Health

Joan Casey received her doctoral degree from the department of environmental health sciences at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health in 2014. Her research focuses on using electronic health records and spatial statistics to study the relationship between emerging environmental exposures and population health. Casey has an interest in a range of exposures including unconventional natural gas and oil development, environmental noise pollution, and concentrated animal feeding operations. 

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Going Down the Up Escalator of Climate Change

Saturday 9 a.m.10 a.m.  

Some of the most promising solutions for slowing climate change also bring immediate benefits for human health, agricultural productivity, and climate equity.  We describe the reasons for advancing these solutions, our research on why it is timely to start now, and the momentum that the state and UC system have attained towards these worthy environmental objectives.

Speaker(s): 
William D. Collins
Senior Scientist and Director, Climate and Ecosystem Sciences, Berkeley Lab; Professor in Residence, Earth and Planetary Science

William Collins is an internationally recognized expert in climate modeling and climate change science. Collins’s role in launching the Department of Energy’s Accelerated Climate Model for Energy (ACME) program was awarded the U.S. Department of Energy Secretary’s Achievement Award on May 7, 2015.  He is also a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS).  He was a Lead Author on the Fourth Assessment of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), for which the IPCC was awarded the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize.  Dr. Collins received his undergraduate degree in physics from Princeton University and earned an M.S. and Ph.D. in astrophysics from the University of Chicago.

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University Library Book Sale

Saturday 9 a.m.3 p.m.  

Expand your home library at this annual bargain-hunting bonanza. Search for treasures among thousands of hardbacks and soft-covers — all for just one dollar each!

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College of Engineering Homecoming Kickoff

Saturday 9:30 a.m.10:30 a.m.  

Engineering alumni and parents are invited to join us for coffee, pastries, and an informal opportunity to meet college deans, faculty, and student leaders as well as fellow members of the Berkeley Engineering community. There will be no formal program; students and their families are welcome to join us!

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College of Environmental Design: State of the College Presentation

Saturday 9:30 a.m.10:30 a.m.  

Join Dean Jennifer Wolch, department chairs, and the assistant dean of development and alumni relations to hear the latest exciting news from the College of Environmental Design.

Please register here: ced.berkeley.edu/events-media/events/college-of-environmental-design-open-house

Sponsored by: 
College of Environmental Design
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KALX 55th Anniversary Alumni Reunion

Saturday 10 a.m.12 p.m.  

KALX invites station alums to join us in celebrating 55 years of radio magic! Catch up with old friends, share your fondest radio memories, and see what the station looks like today. Light refreshments will be served.

 
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Morrison Library Open House

Saturday 10 a.m.3 p.m.  

Don’t miss exploring the magnificent Morrison, opened within Doe Library in 1928. This traditional reading room is one of the architectural treasures of the Berkeley campus; it’s also a place where students can relax, with comfortable seating and a circulating collection of newly published books.

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Reunion Volunteer Leadership Reception

Saturday 10 a.m.11 a.m.  

Each year, hundreds of alumni volunteers raise funds and do outreach for their class campaigns. This special, invitation-only breakfast hosted by Chancellor Christ thanks them for helping to sustain Berkeley’s excellence.

Contact Tammy Spath at tspath@berkeley.edu for more information.

Sponsored by: 
Class Campaigns
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Touchdown! Athletic Artifacts

Saturday 10 a.m.2 p.m.  

Sports have existed in various forms throughout history and around the world. Come check out a special selection of sporting artifacts in celebration of the Homecoming football game. Get a glimpse of some never-before-exhibited objects, from Alaskan sealskin balls to miniature Iroquois lacrosse sticks. While you’re here, explore the new exhibit “People Made These Things: Connecting with the Makers of Our World.”

The Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology has waived admission for Homecoming guests — simply show your badge at the entrance.

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CalSO Comes Together at Bear Affair

Saturday 10:30 a.m.1:30 p.m.  

Calling all CalSO and CalPrep alumni and family! Join us at the Bear Affair BBQ for our annual reunion during Homecoming. Reconnect with folks from your year and meet alums from throughout the years. Let’s do the Timewarp again!

If you have questions or would like to confirm your seating with our group, please email timewarpcalso@gmail.com.

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Guided Tours of Wurster Hall Renovations

Saturday 10:30 a.m.11:30 a.m.  

Take a guided tour of the latest additions and improvements to our building, brought about through the generosity of our donors. Meet in the first-floor lobby and then tour the first-floor classrooms, the Rice & Bones cafe, Ong & Ong Plaza, the seventh-floor studio, and The Hub.

Please register for this event at ced.berkeley.edu/events-media/events/college-of-environmental-design-open-house.

Sponsored by: 
College of Environmental Design
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Information and Consumer Choices: Studies Using Supermarket Data

Saturday 10:30 a.m.11:30 a.m.  

How do consumers respond to changes in the information they’re presented with at the point of purchase? Evidence from retail field experiments in the wine category will be presented and discussed.

Speaker(s): 
Sofia Berto Villas-Boas Ph.D. '02
Professor, Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics

Sofia Berto Villas-Boas was born in Portugal. Her research interests include industrial organization, consumer behavior, food policy, and environmental regulation. She is interested on how consumers respond to product characteristics such as nutritional content; and the environmental sustainability of production practices of products. 

Sponsored by: 
College of Natural Resources
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Inventing the Future

Saturday 10:30 a.m.11:30 a.m.  

We have an audacious goal: to invent a better, more promising future for generations to come. Whatever the domain — health, cognition, work, mobility, or infrastructure — there are unprecedented opportunities for technologies to create solutions, provided we develop them responsibly. An interdisciplinary community of Berkeley Engineering researchers are working to invent our future through innovations that serve society with a consideration for ethics built in from the start. Join us for this visionary conversation featuring a panel of engineering faculty hosted by Dean Sastry.

Speaker(s): 
S. Shankar Sastry
Dean and Roy W. Carlson Professor of Engineering

S. Shankar Sastry is a Berkeley alumnus as well as a seasoned, popular professor and an internationally recognized expert on embedded and autonomous software. He has invested decades in technology research, spearheading projects to improve the nation’s cybersecurity and network infrastructure. His other research initiatives include robotics and hybrid and embedded systems. Sastry holds faculty appointments in the departments of Bioengineering; Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences; and Mechanical Engineering.

Ken Goldberg
Professor and Department Chair, Industrial Engineering and Operations Research

Ken Goldberg holds secondary appointments at Cal in EECS, Art Practice, and the School of Information; and in radiation oncology at the UCSF Medical School. He directs the CITRIS “People and Robots” initiative and the UC Berkeley AUTOLAB, where he and his students pursue research in geometric algorithms and machine learning for robotics and automation in surgery, manufacturing, and other applications.

Aaron Streets
Assistant Professor, Bioengineering

Aaron Streets joined the Bioengineering faculty in 2016 and is now a Chan Zuckerberg Biohub investigator, designing fluidic microchips to enable researchers to study single cells and make a variety of measurements on the same cell.

 

Claire Tomlin
Charles A. Desoer Chair, and Professor, Electrical Engineering & Computer Sciences

Claire Tomlin’s areas of research include control, intelligent systems, and robotics (CIR); and biosystems and computational biology (BIO). Currently, she is working on research in cyber-physical systems to develop a theory of “ActionWebs” — networked, embedded, sensor-rich systems that coordinate multiple decision-makers.

Joan Walker
Professor, Civil and Environmental Engineering and Acting Director, Institute of Transportation Studies

Joan Walker co-directs the interdisciplinary Global Metropolitan Studies (GMS) initiative. Her research focus is behavioral modeling, with an expertise in discrete choice analysis and travel behavior. She works to improve the models that are used for transportation planning, policy, and operations.

Sponsored by: 
College of Engineering
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Students or Athletes: Can You Be Both on the Berkeley Campus?

Saturday 10:30 a.m.11:30 a.m.  

Get perspective on the student-athlete role on the Berkeley campus from an alumnus and lecturer who has been working with Cal student-athletes for more than two decades.Marshawn Lynch, Justin Forsett, Nnamdi Asomugha, Jared Goff, Davis Webb, Jaylen Brown, Ivan Rabb, Missy Franklin, and Ryan Murphy. 

Speaker(s): 
Stephen Etter
Finance Lecturer, Haas School of Business

Stephen Etter ’83, M.B.A. ’89 is one of the founding partners of Greyrock Capital Group, which manages over $700 million in four funds. Etter has been a lecturer on corporate finance for the Haas School of Business for the past 22 years — 44 consecutive semesters. His focus has been on athletes majoring in business and others planning a career in the business world after graduation. He teaches a unique, nationally-recognized course preparing student-athletes for life after Berkeley as professionals in the sports world. Prior students include Marshawn Lynch, Justin Forsett, Nnamdi Asomugha, Jared Goff, Davis Webb, Jaylen Brown, Ivan Rabb, Missy Franklin, and Ryan Murphy. Etter has been awarded the Cheit Distinguished Teaching Award twice.  20th year serving as a director of the San Francisco Giants Community Fund.

Sponsored by: 
Haas School of Business
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The 2016 Election: What Working-Class Voters Are Thinking

Saturday 10:30 a.m.12 p.m.  

The 2016 election results were a shock to many blue state residents across the country. White, working-class voters voted in droves for Donald Trump, leaving many wondering how it had happened and if this meant a new status quo. In this panel, speakers discuss the mindsets of working-class voters and how our country can bridge its gaping political divide.

Speaker(s): 
Steven Hayward
Ronald Reagan Professor of Public Policy, Pepperdine University

Steven Hayward is a visiting scholar at the UC Berkeley Institute of Governmental Studies and a Fox News commentator.

Arlie Hochschild
Professor Emerita, Department of Sociology

Professor Hochschild is the author of Strangers in Their Own Land: Anger and Mourning on the American Right, a finalist for the National Book Award. She conducted five years of intensive interviews with Tea Party enthusiasts in Louisiana, learning about what and how these voters see, think and feel.

Steve Phillips
Founder of Democracy in Color

Steve Phillips founded Democracy in Color, an organization focused on race, politics and the new American majority. He is also the author of New York Times and Washington Post bestseller Brown Is the New White: How the Demographic Revolution Has Created a New American Majority. Phillips is a national political leader, civil rights lawyer, and senior fellow at the Center for American Progress.

Sponsored by: 
Goldman School of Public Policy & The Berkeley Forum
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Using the Sun’s Power to Pull Water from the Desert

Saturday 10:30 a.m.11:30 a.m.  

More than two-thirds of the world’s population lives in water-stressed regions. We recently demonstrated that water in the atmosphere can be harvested to deliver fresh water using metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) — a class of materials we discovered 20 years ago. Learn about the technology currently being further developed at UC Berkeley’s College of Chemistry and the Berkeley Global Science Institute.

Speaker(s): 
Omar Yaghi
James and Neeltje Tretter Chair Professor of Chemistry

Originally from Jordan, Omar Yaghi received his B.S. from State University of New York-Albany and Ph.D. from the University of Illinois-Urbana. He was an National Science Foundation postdoctoral fellow at Harvard and has been on the faculties of Arizona State University, University of Michigan, and UCLA. He is the founding director of the Berkeley Global Science Institute; and the co-director of the Kavli Energy NanoScience Institute and California Research Alliance by BASF.  

The recipient of many scientific awards, he is widely known for inventing several classes of new materials termed metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), covalent organic frameworks, and zeolitic imidazolate frameworks. These materials have the highest surface areas known to date, making them useful in clean energy storage and generation, separation of hydrogen, methane, and carbon dioxide, and in clean water production and delivery. He is among the top five most highly cited chemists worldwide, having published over 200 articles that have received, on average, more than 300 citations per paper.

Sponsored by: 
College of Chemistry
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Vacant Lots, Climate Change, and the Unexpected Future of Civic Infrastructure

Saturday 10:30 a.m.11:30 a.m.  

One of the most valuable resources making American cities more resilient in the face of climate change is the lowly vacant lot. Over the last six years, de Monchaux and his team have used digital mapping tools and data science to devise essential, efficient, and fair ways to reinforce cities’ physical, social, and ecological resilience to face the growing and multifaceted threats to our urban communities and infrastructure. This work shows how digital mapping and design methods can reveal new opportunities and design methods in our cities’ most unexpected and underappreciated environments.

Speaker(s): 
Nicholas de Monchaux
Associate Professor of Architecture and Urban Design and Director of the Berkeley Center for New Media

Nicholas de Monchaux is the author of Spacesuit: Fashioning Apollo (2011), an architectural and urban history of the Apollo spacesuit, winner of the Eugene Emme award from the American Astronautical Society and shortlisted for the Art Book Prize; and Local Code: 3,659 Proposals About Data, Design, and the Nature of Cities (2016). With Kathryn Moll, he is principal of Modem. His work has been exhibited widely, including at the Biennial of the Americas, the Venice Architecture Biennale, the Lisbon Architecture Triennial, SFMOMA, and the Chicago MCA.

Sponsored by: 
College of Environmental Design
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Designing the Future: Jacobs Institute Open House

Saturday 11 a.m.12:30 p.m.  

Meet student makers who are developing thoughtful solutions to real-world problems and participate in activities for makers of all ages at the Jacobs Institute for Design Innovation — Berkeley’s interdisciplinary hub at the intersection of design and technology. From prototypes in fields like health and sustainability to new community initiatives, explore how students are working to invent a better future.

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Feed the Bears Tour

Saturday 11 a.m.12:30 p.m.  

Take a tour focused on the university’s philanthropic history, including the programs and buildings made possible by private giving. Philanthropy has had a tremendous impact on the Berkeley campus, changing the physical silhouette with new buildings, making the Berkeley experience possible through scholarships, and much more.

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CED Luncheon in the Courtyard

Saturday 12 p.m.2 p.m.  

Enjoy a complimentary lunch from our new café, Rice & Bones, in the beautiful east courtyard as you mingle and reconnect with fellow alumni, faculty, and students. Beer and wine will be served.

Please register for this event at ced.berkeley.edu/events-media/events/college-of-environmental-design-open-house.

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Emotion and Aging: Two Roads Diverged

Saturday 12 p.m.1 p.m.  

Many things change with age, but our emotions follow their own unique paths. This talk will discuss how we study emotion in our Berkeley laboratory and share some of our newest findings about emotion, close relationships, and aging.

Speaker(s): 
Robert Levenson
Professor, Department of Psychology and Director, Institute of Personality and Social Research

Robert Levenson has been on the faculty at UC Berkeley since 1986 and is a member of the clinical science, social/personality, and developmental areas. His research is on human emotion, with particular interests in the influences of age, gender, culture, and disease.

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KALX Radio Open House

Saturday 12 p.m.2 p.m.  

All are invited to take a peek inside the campus radio station, the mighty 90.7 FM. Take a tour of the KALX studios, check out the extensive record collection housing over 115,000 pieces of music, and everything else the 55-year-old station has to offer. Tours will be conducted on a drop-in basis, so stop by KALX any time.

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UC Berkeley and the Political Economy of Public Higher Education

Saturday 12 p.m.1 p.m.  

Public higher education is struggling financially throughout the United States, and the University of California is no exception. Right here at UC Berkeley we are in the midst of a $150 million budget crisis that has created tension throughout the campus and is forcing us to wrestle with the challenge of trying to deliver the best education in the world with ever-dwindling resources. Our financial struggles, moreover, have not been borne evenly: surprising increases in spending coupled with steadily decreasing state funding have been met with rapid increases in tuition, creating levels of student debt never before seen and decreasing access to the public university for all but the most elite members of society. Taking a political economy approach, we will look at the forces that are shaping public higher education today and try to uncover how we ended up in the situation in which we now find ourselves, what possibilities the future might hold, and what role each of us might play in bringing about those futures.
 

Speaker(s): 
Khalid Kadir Ph.D. '10
Lecturer, International and Area Studies and Global Poverty and Practice Program

While finishing his Ph.D. in civil and environmental engineering, Khalid Kadir began studying the complex role that engineering expertise plays in the politics of international development and poverty alleviation. This combination of engineering and social science research led to his current interdisciplinary teaching on global poverty, political economy, and environmental engineering. As a lecturer at Berkeley, Khalid was selected as a Chancellor’s Public Scholar in 2013; awarded the Chancellor’s Award for Public Service in 2014; and this past year, he received UC Berkeley’s Distinguished Teaching Award, the campus’s most prestigious honor for teaching.

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Winners and Losers 2017

Saturday 12 p.m.1 p.m.  

In the race for digital dominance, a gang of four have emerged: Amazon, Facebook, Google, and Apple. As they continue to grab shares of the retail and media industries, who will fall victim at the hands of the gang? What is their impact on broader business and society as a whole? Galloway will outline his predictions in a 90-miles-an-hour volley of data and insights.

Speaker(s): 
Scott Galloway

Scott Galloway is a professor of marketing at the NYU Stern School of Business where he teaches brand strategy and digital marketing to second-year M.B.A. students and is the author of the Digital IQ Index, a global ranking of prestige brands’ digital competence. In 2012, Galloway was named “One of the World’s 50 Best Business School Professors” by Poets & Quants. He is also the founder of several firms including: L2,a subscription business intelligence firm serving prestige brands; RedEnvelope, an e-commerce firm; and Prophet, a global brand strategy consultancy featuring more than 250 professionals. Galloway was elected to the World Economic Forum’s “Global Leaders of Tomorrow,” which recognizes 100 individuals under the age of 40 “whose accomplishments have had impact on a global level.” He has served on the board of directors of Eddie Bauer,The New York Times Company, Gateway Computer, and Berkeley’s Haas School of Business. He received a B.A. from UCLA and an M.B.A. from the Haas School of Business.

Sponsored by: 
Haas School of Business
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A Tale of Two Fats: Fighting the Obesity Epidemic by Engineering Brown Adipose Tissue

Saturday 1:30 p.m.2:30 p.m.  

Current approaches to treat obesity and associated disorders like diabetes and fatty liver disease have proven inefficient, judging by the unabated rise of such diseases in the U.S. and worldwide. This lecture outlines how we are developing and testing a novel anti-obesity approach based on the expansion of “brown fat,” a tissue type with a very high metabolic activity that might lead to the conversion of excess calories into heat.

Speaker(s): 
Andreas Stahl
Professor and Chair, Department of Nutritional Sciences

After receiving his Ph.D. for work done at the Scripps Research Institute in La Jolla, Andreas Stahl expanded his training at the Whitehead Institute/MIT where he uncovered a family of fatty acid transporters. He subsequently took up a position as associate staff scientist at the Palo Alto Medial Foundation Research Institute and the Stanford University School of Medicine. Stahl joined UC Berkeley in 2007 where he has continued his work on obesity-related disorders and the molecular mechanisms of nutrient transport.

Sponsored by: 
College of Natural Resources
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Human Resilience: The Role of Emotions and Emotion Regulation in Overcoming Stress

Saturday 1:30 p.m.2:30 p.m.  

Psychological stress caused by events such as loss, conflict, and poverty can have devastating effects on psychological and physical health. I does not, however, have these effects on all people. The question this lecture explores is, “How do resilient people avoid the harmful effects of stress?” In answering this question, we’ll consider what makes stress harmful and how people can neutralize it by achieving control over — regulating — their emotions.

Speaker(s): 
Iris Mauss
Associate Professor, Department of Psychology

Iris Mauss, originally from Germany, received her Ph.D. in psychology in 2005 from Stanford University. She was an assistant professor at the University of Denver before joining the faculty at UC Berkeley. Her research examines what human emotions are, how people can best manage their emotions, and how emotion and its regulation contribute to psychological and physical health. Her work has been published widely, including in EmotionJournal of Personality and Social Psychology, Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, and Psychophysiology. She has received numerous awards, including the American Psychological Association’s Distinguished Scientific Award for an Early Career Contribution to Psychology in the area of Social Psychology.

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The New and the Old: A Walking Tour of Campus

Saturday 2 p.m.3 p.m.  

Experience UC Berkeley’s past, present, and future with a campus ambassador as your friendly, knowledgeable guide. You’ll check out some of the campus’s newest buildings, a few currently under construction, and some long-beloved edifices.

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How to Think with Hamilton, Then and Now

Saturday 3 p.m.4 p.m.  

In line with our 2017 On The Same Page topic — the music of Hamilton — this lecture will explore Alexander Hamilton himself. We will discuss a variety of contexts from the era of Hamilton’s lifetime that help to make sense of the arc of his career, then try to assess Hamilton’s relevance to other contemporary contexts.

Speaker(s): 
Mark Peterson
Professor and Chair, Department of History

Mark Peterson is a historian specializing in colonial and revolutionary America. He is the author of The Price of Redemption: The Spiritual Economy of Puritan New England (1997) and The City-State of Boston, 1630–1865 (forthcoming 2018) as well as numerous articles. He is currently at work on a book called The Long Crisis of the Constitution that explores the challenges a constitution written for the 1780s poses for the contemporary United States.

Sponsored by: 
On the Same Page
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A Fly in My Wine

Saturday 7 p.m.  

Alumni, family, and friends of entomology at Cal are welcome to join us for an evening of wine, cheese, conversation, and lots of extraordinary arthropods. Reunite with old friends and meet new researchers studying the ecology, evolution, behavior, and biological control of insects and spiders. Learn about all the many places we are working and the exciting new initiatives in outreach and education, historical archives, and collaborations with other museums.

Please email essig.museum@gmail.com to reserve your spot and visit /essig.berkeley.edu/events/homecoming for more details.

Sponsored by: 
Essig Museum
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Théâtre de la Ville, Paris; State of Siege

Saturday 8 p.m.  
Sunday 3 p.m.  

The remarkable troupe of Paris’s Théâtre de la Ville returns to Berkeley after the smash success of its 2014 performance of Pirandello’s Six Characters in Search of an Author. Again under the inspired direction of Emmanuel Demarcy-Mota, the company visits with a new production based on Albert Camus’ fantastical yet frightening political allegory about the necessity of resistance in the face of authoritarianism. Demarcy-Mota describes State of Siege as “a distorted mirror of a nightmarish future in which a city is reduced to silence and submission to authority.”

Please note: State of Siege is performed in French with English supertitles. 

Tickets start at $48. Use promo code HOME2017 to save 10 percent on single ticket prices in sections 2–6 purchased after September 5. Order online at calperformances.org.

Sponsored by: 
Cal Performances
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Women's Soccer vs. Oregon

Sunday 11 a.m.12:30 p.m.  

Watch the team go up against the Oregon Ducks in historic Edwards Stadium.

$10 per adult, $5 per youth or senior, free for Cal students with ID

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Women's Volleyball vs. Washington

Sunday 1 p.m.2:30 p.m.  

Root for the Golden Bears as they host the Washington Huskies. 

$10 per adult, $5 per youth or senior, free for Cal students with ID

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Olli Mustonen, Piano

Sunday 3 p.m.  

A true Renaissance man who often appears as conductor, composer, and pianist in the same concert, Olli Mustonen channels all the breadth of his musical insight and experience into his exuberant solo recitals. Mustonen lends his vivid and balanced touch to lighter works by Schumann and Shchedrin, balanced by Beethoven’s Second Piano Sonata and Prokofiev’s dense and tumultuous Stalingrad Sonata. Full program: Schumann/Kinderszenen, Op. 15; Beethoven/Sonata No. 2 in A Major, Op. 2, No. 2; Rodion Shchedrin/Notebook for Young People; Prokofiev/Sonata No. 7 in B-flat Major, Op. 83, Stalingrad.

Tickets start at $46 and can be ordered online at calperformances.org.

Sponsored by: 
Cal Performances
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