All Homecoming Events

Bear Affair Tailgate BBQ

3 hours before football kickoff
October 05, 2013 00:00:00 October 05, 2013 00:00:00 Bear Affair Tailgate BBQ 3 hours before football kickoff Homecoming Headquarters America/Los_Angeles

Relax before the game at a traditional tailgate barbeque open to everyone. Price includes second helpings. Special seating area for Cal parents and each alumni class. $30 for adults; $20 for current Cal students and kids 5–17; free for kids 4 and under. Includes the Class Pass, with unlimited access all weekend to faculty seminars, museums, libraries, walking tours, golf-cart service, and snacks at Homecoming Headquarters.

 

Cal vs. Washington State Homecoming Football Game

Time To Be Determined
Saturday |
October 11, 2014 00:00:00 October 11, 2014 00:00:00 Cal vs. Washington State Homecoming Football Game Time To Be Determined Memorial Stadium America/Los_Angeles

Cheer on your Golden Bears in the company of friends and family. Individual game tickets are sold separately through Cal Athletics: beginning July 16, visit calbears.com/code and enter the appropriate code below to receive a ticket discount and special seating with your classmates or fellow Cal Parents*.

Cal Parents:
PARENTS2015

Reunion Classes:
REUNION1955
REUNION1960
REUNION1965
REUNION1970
REUNION1975
REUNION1980
REUNION1985
REUNION1990
REUNION1995
REUNION2000
REUNION2005

All other alumni and friends:
HOMECOMING

*Please note that students with season tickets sit in their own section. If they would like to sit with their families, they will need to purchase an additional ticket.

Stars and Planets and Black Holes, Oh My!

Time To Be Determined
October 02, 2015 00:00:00 October 02, 2015 00:00:00 Stars and Planets and Black Holes, Oh My! Time To Be Determined Wheeler Auditorium America/Los_Angeles

Lick Observatory, an iconic, 127-year-old research facility on Mt. Hamilton, is a vibrant base for the University of California's astronomy education and outreach efforts. Here, Berkeley students gain invaluable hands-on experience in cutting-edge fields such as stellar explosions, Earth-like planets orbiting other stars, and giant black holes. Learn about recent discoveries and how you can help sustain the observatory.

Speaker(s): 
Alex Filippenko
Professor of Astronomy

One of the world's most highly cited astronomers and an elected member of the National Academy of Sciences, Filippenko was the only person to have served on both teams that simultaneously discovered the accelerating expansion of the universe. Voted by Berkeley students the "Best Professor" on campus a record nine times, he appears frequently on TV documentaries and is addicted to observing total solar eclipses (14 so far).

Problem Drinking and Sexual Risk-taking in Latino Migrant Day Laborers

Friday 10:00 AM to 11:00 AM |
October 02, 2015 10:00:00 October 02, 2015 11:00:00 Problem Drinking and Sexual Risk-taking in Latino Migrant Day Laborers Sibley Auditorium, Bechtel Engineering Center America/Los_Angeles

​This presentation will explore the ways in which the harsh living and working conditions of Latino migrant day laborers allow for vulnerability to psychosocial and health problems. The talk will advance a theory of structural vulnerability to explain the production and reproduction of such problems. This research was funded by a large federal grant from the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism awarded to Organista as principal investigator.

Sponsored by: 
School of Social Welfare

Undergraduate Admissions at UC Berkeley

Friday 10:00 AM to 11:00 AM |
October 02, 2015 10:00:00 October 02, 2015 11:00:00 Undergraduate Admissions at UC Berkeley Maude Fife Room, 3rd Floor, Wheeler Hall America/Los_Angeles

Get an overview of Berkeley admissions, including how we recruit, evaluate, and select new undergraduate students. Learn how we balance selective admissions and holistic review while fulfilling our mission as a public university.

Speaker(s): 
Greg Dubrow
Director of Research & Policy Analysis, Office of Undergraduate Admissions

Dubrow has been at  Berkeley for more than 10 years, leading the analytical efforts for undergraduate admissions. Prior to coming to Cal, he was an assistant professor of education policy at Florida International University in Miami. He earned a Ph.D. in higher education policy at the University of Pennsylvania and a B.A. in film/TV/communications from Temple University.

Your Brain on Stress — It's All About Plasticity

Friday 10:00 AM to 11:00 AM |
October 02, 2015 10:00:00 October 02, 2015 11:00:00 Your Brain on Stress — It's All About Plasticity Alumni House America/Los_Angeles

Psychological stress is a big part of modern life and, as we've all learned by now, it affects our bodies and brains. Discover the details during this talk: Is all stress bad for you? In what context can stress be beneficial for brain function? Can exposure to stress impact our vulnerability to develop mental illness? Kaufer will present findings from her lab about the plastic changes that occur in the brain in response to stress — and the consequences on mental, cognitive, and neurological function.

Speaker(s): 
Daniela Kaufer
Associate Professor, Integrative Biology and Helen Wills Neuroscience Institute

Kaufer earned her Ph.D. from The Hebrew University in Jerusalem and was a neurosurgery research fellow at Stanford. She is currently an associate professor of neuroscience and integrative biology at Berkeley. Research in her lab is focused on the events underlying the plasticity of the brain in the face of stress and neurological insults throughout life, with a particular focus on developmental trajectories toward cognitive, emotional, and neurological vulnerability and resilience. Kaufer is the recipient of the National Institute of Mental Health's BRAINS (Biobehavioral Research Awards for Innovative New Scientists) award to study pathways that lead from early life stress to mental illness vulnerability, and of the BAKAR fellowship to study post-traumatic epilepsy.

Sponsored by: 
Prytanean Alumnae, Inc.

Self-Compassion: Antecedents and Consequences for Growth and Self-Improvement

Friday 11:30 AM to 12:30 PM |
October 02, 2015 11:30:00 October 02, 2015 12:30:00 Self-Compassion: Antecedents and Consequences for Growth and Self-Improvement Sibley Auditorium, Bechtel Engineering Center America/Los_Angeles

The scientific study of self-compassion — approaching one’s own suffering with an attitude of kindness and non-judgmental understanding — has flourished in recent years. Self-compassion is especially crucial when dealing with failure or rejection, negative events that can lead to self-criticism. This talk describes recent findings emerging from Chen's lab, touching on antecedents of self-compassion, i.e, what promotes its practice; and illuminating the consequences of self-compassion, particularly for personal growth and self-improvement.

Speaker(s): 
Serena Chen
Professor of Psychology

Chen is the Marian E. and Daniel E. Koshland, Jr. Distinguished Chair for Innovative Teaching and Research at Berkeley. She is a Fellow of the Society of Personality and Social Psychology, American Psychological Association, and the Association of Psychological Science. Chen was also the recipient of the Early Career Award from the International Society for Self and Identity, and the Distinguished Teaching Award from the Social Sciences Division of Berkeley.

Sponsored by: 
College of Letters & Science

How are Cal Band Formations Created?

Friday 2:00 PM to 3:00 PM |
October 02, 2015 14:00:00 October 02, 2015 15:00:00 How are Cal Band Formations Created? Alumni House America/Los_Angeles

Two insiders provide a brief history of the Cal Band, including how field formations are conceptualized and charted. Learn how this is accomplished on arrangements ranging from traditional Cal songs to contemporary selections. Hint: it involves something called a "poop sheet"!

Speaker(s): 
Bob Calonico
Cal Band Director

Calonico has been teaching at Berkeley since 1990 and has served as director of UC Jazz Ensembles and director of bands since 1995. In May 2016, he will travel with the marching band on tour to China and Japan.

Samuel Cappoli
Cal Band Drum Major

Cappoli hails from Southern California and will receive his bachelor's in mechanical engineering in 2016.

Sponsored by: 
Student Musical Activities

History Walking Tour

Friday 3:00 PM to 4:30 PM |
October 02, 2015 15:00:00 October 02, 2015 16:30:00 History Walking Tour Homecoming Headquarters Tour Tent America/Los_Angeles

Don't miss this rare chance to explore the campus with one of its most revered historians, Peter S. Van Houten '56, M.A. '62, Ed. D. '73. On this take a fun, easy walking tour, you'll benefit from the encyclopedic knowledge of Cal's memorable people, buildings, events, and traditions that Van Houten has gained during his 50-plus years on campus as student and administrator. You'll gain a very special perspective — and "meet" some important historical figures from Berkeley's fascinating past.

Technology and Human Rights

Friday 3:30 PM to 4:30 PM |
October 02, 2015 15:30:00 October 02, 2015 16:30:00 Technology and Human Rights Alumni House America/Los_Angeles

Over the course of the past decade, the United States has increasingly used drone technology for various policy-related purposes, including targeted assassinations and surveillance. In this seminar, Dr. Koenig will discuss how drones are being used both globally and at home; some of the legal issues that have emerged from their use; and the ways in which human rights actors are using new technologies to document and investigate the world's most egregious crimes.

Sponsored by: 
Berkeley Law

Neuroscience: Your Brain at Berkeley

October 02, 2015 15:30:00 October 02, 2015 16:30:00 Neuroscience: Your Brain at Berkeley Sibley Auditorium, Bechtel Engineering Center America/Los_Angeles

Neuroscience — the biological study of brain and behavior — is in an era of rapid discovery. Modern research is revealing how the brain develops, senses the world, computes, learns, controls​ ​movement, and performs many of the cognitive functions that make us human. This seminar will survey recent discoveries made at Berkeley that give new insight into brain function and dysfunction​ ​in neurological disease.

Speaker(s): 
Dan Feldman
Associate Professor, Molecular & Cell Biology

Feldman earned his Ph.D. from Stanford University and did postdoctoral research​ ​at UCSF and at the National Institutes of Health. He has been at Berkeley since 2007.​ ​His research laboratory studies the function of the brain’s cerebral cortex. In addition to undergraduate teaching, he is director of the Neuroscience Ph.D. program at Berkeley.

Sponsored by: 
Letters & Science, Molecular & Cell Biology and Helen Wills Neuroscience Center

Energy Policy in the US and Around the World

October 03, 2015 10:30:00 October 03, 2015 11:30:00 Energy Policy in the US and Around the World Arthur Andersen Auditorium, Haas School of Business America/Los_Angeles

Wolfram will discuss such current energy policy issues as climate change and efforts to reduce emissions from the energy sector; the link between energy and economic development; and the use of big data to inform energy policy.

Speaker(s): 
Catherine Wolfram
Faculty Director, Energy Institute

Catherine Wolfram is the faculty director of the Energy Institute at the Haas School of Business and the Cora Jane Flood Professor of Business Administration. She has been at Berkeley-Haas for 15 years and has twice been honored with the Earl F. Cheit Award for Excellence in Teaching. Wolfram earned her B.A. in economics from Harvard University and Ph.D. in economics from MIT. She has served as the associate editor for The Economics Journal and The Journal of Industrial Economics. Today, her research focus is on energy markets and environmental regulation. She is a faculty scientist in the environmental energy technologies division of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. 

Sponsored by: 
Haas School of Business

The Jacobs Institute: At the Intersection of Design and Technology

Saturday 10:30 AM to 11:30 AM |
October 03, 2015 10:30:00 October 03, 2015 11:30:00 The Jacobs Institute: At the Intersection of Design and Technology Jacobs Hall, 3rd Floor America/Los_Angeles

Budding engineers, artists and game-changers from many fields meet at the Jacobs Institute for Design Innovation to turn visionary ideas into designs to help improve the world. Jacobs Hall, the institute's home, will open August 2015. With five design studios and the latest equipment for rapid prototyping and digital fabrication, it provides space and resources where students can realize ambitious ideas. Jacobs Institute CTO Björn Hartmann will present the history and vision behind the Institute and share how design education will play a crucial role in our students' futures.

Speaker(s): 
Björn Hartmann
Chief Technology Officer, Jacobs Institute and Associate Professor, Electrical Engineering & Computer Sciences

Hartmann received a B.A. in communications, B.S.E. in digital media design, and M.S.E. in computer and information science from the University of Pennsylvania in 2002. He received his P.h.D. in computer science from Stanford University in 2009. His research in human-computer interaction focuses on the creation and evaluation of user interface design tools, end-user programming environments, and ubiquitous computing tool kits. He co-founded the CITRIS Invention Lab, a precursor to the Jacobs Institute.

Sponsored by: 
College of Engineering

Campanile 100th Celebration

Saturday 11:00 AM to 12:00 PM |
October 03, 2015 11:00:00 October 03, 2015 12:00:00 Campanile 100th Celebration Campanile Esplanade America/Los_Angeles

Join the campus in celebrating the 100th anniversary of our beloved Sather Tower, a.k.a the Campanile. The bells will play "Happy Birthday" to commemorate this historic occasion, and you're invited to sing along — and to have a slice of birthday cake!

Bringing Design to Life: Digital Fabrication for All

Saturday 11:30 AM to 12:30 PM |
October 03, 2015 11:30:00 October 03, 2015 12:30:00 Bringing Design to Life: Digital Fabrication for All Jacobs Hall, 1st Floor America/Los_Angeles

Dive into the world of digital fabrication and prototyping with laser-cutters and 3D printers at the Jacobs Institute for Design Innovation. You'll get inspired —  and get your hands dirty — making a personalized souvenir with help from our team of technicians. No experience necessary; just bring your creativity and an open mind,

Unraveling the Quantum Ensemble

Saturday 12:00 PM to 1:00 PM |
October 03, 2015 12:00:00 October 03, 2015 13:00:00 Unraveling the Quantum Ensemble Banatao Auditorium, Sutardja Dai Hall America/Los_Angeles

In the quantum world, an object can simultaneously exist in multiple states, the "dead" and "alive" character of Schrödinger's proverbial cat being a quintessential example. It is the act of measurement which drives such an exotic superposition to a more familiar classical outcome — "dead" or "alive" for the cat — thus bridging the gap between quantum mechanics and our concept of reality. The precise nature of this so-called wave function collapse, however, remains a topic of debate at the intersection of physics, mathematics, and philosophy. In recent experiments, we have reconstructed the real-time collapse of the wave function describing a two-state system, thereby filling in the details of this mysterious process.

Speaker(s): 
Irfan Siddiqi
Professor of Physics

Siddiqi obtained his undergraduate degree from Harvard University and went on to get his doctorate from Yale. He joined Berkeley in 2005; his experimental research group focuses on quantum effects in nanoscale circuits at temperatures near absolute zero. Siddiqi has won a number of awards, including the George E. Valley prize from the American Physical Society, and citations from several branches of the Department of Defense.

Sponsored by: 
College of Letters & Science

Alumni Panel: Why Culture Matters

October 03, 2015 12:00:00 October 03, 2015 13:00:00 Alumni Panel: Why Culture Matters Arthur Andersen Auditorium, Haas School of Business America/Los_Angeles

UC Berkeley is broadly recognized for its distinctive culture and values: how we view ourselves and how others view us shape the impact we have on our immediate communities and around the world. The Haas School of Business has its own robust culture, and in recent years the force behind all initiatives has been the school's Defining Principles: "question the status quo," "confidence without attitude," "students always," and "beyond yourself." The principles guide and define the Berkeley-Haas community in all its endeavors, from admissions to alumni relations. Haas Dean Rich Lyons leads an alumni panel in a discussion on the invaluable space that culture occupies in an organization and a community.

Speaker(s): 
Rich Lyons
Dean, Haas School of Business

Rich Lyons has served as dean of the Haas School of Business since 2008. As an alumnus of the school's undergraduate program, his ties to Berkeley-Haas were established long before his deanship. He earned his Ph.D. in economics from MIT and was an assistant professor at Columbia Business School before returning to Berkeley as a faculty member in 1993. Lyons's teaching and research interests are in international finance and leadership. From 2006 to 2008 he held the position of chief learning officer at Goldman Sachs where he focused on leadership development. Over the years Lyons has received several teaching awards and in 1998 was honored with the Distinguished Teaching Award, Berkeley's highest teaching honor. A signature achievement of Dean Lyons's tenure has been the establishment of the Defining Principles as the Haas School's cultural cornerstone.

Sponsored by: 
Haas School of Business

Unleashing Science for a Sustainable Economy

Saturday 1:30 PM to 2:30 PM |
October 03, 2015 13:30:00 October 03, 2015 14:30:00 Unleashing Science for a Sustainable Economy Sibley Auditorium, Bechtel Engineering Center America/Los_Angeles

New developments in biology and information technologies provide the foundation for a new renewable economy that can improve human well-being and environmental quality. Our research applies economics to the integration of multidisciplinary knowledge in order to identify the key features of a renewable economy and suggest policies and institutions that will lead to its emergence. It provides insights to address the challenges of biotechnology, biofuels, solar energy, and climate change.

Speaker(s): 
David Zilberman
Professor, Agricultural & Resource Economics

Zilberman holds the Robinson Chair in the Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics and is the faculty director of the Master of Development Practice and co-director of the Environmental Leadership program. He has advised governments, international organizations, and companies on issues of water, biotechnology, and environmental policy. He is also a frequent contributor to the Berkeley Blog.

Sponsored by: 
College of Natural Resources