All Homecoming Events

Berkeley's Ivory Tower: The Campanile at 100 (Exhibition)

Friday 8:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. |
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Saturday 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. |
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Sunday 1:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. |
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Sather Tower, also known as the Campanile, looms large both as a physical structure and as the most widely recognized symbol of the Berkeley campus. This exhibition celebrates the centennial of this landmark through holdings from the University Archives and The Bancroft Library’s manuscript and pictorial collections.

Doe and Moffitt Libraries and Gardner Stacks Open House

Friday 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. |
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Saturday 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. |
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Sunday 1:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. |
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Explore these extraordinary libraries that have served the campus for more than 100 years. Be awed by grand spaces including North Reading Room, Heyns Reading Room, and the Gardner (Main) Stacks, the last of which contains 52 miles of shelves. Delve into exhibits in the Bernice Layne Brown Gallery and elsewhere.

Nothing About Us, Without Us: The 25th Anniversary of ADA (Exhibition)

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Saturday 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. |
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The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) was signed into law on July 26, 1990, by President George H.W. Bush. The ADA is one of America’s most comprehensive pieces of civil rights legislation. It prohibits discrimination and guarantees that people with disabilities have the same opportunities as everyone else to participate in the mainstream of American life — to enjoy employment opportunities, purchase goods and services, and participate in state and local government programs and services. This exhibition draws on the history of the disabled, the activism of the 1970s, and events that led to the passage of the ADA.

University and Jepson Herbaria Open House and Tours

Friday 8:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. |
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Friday 1:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. |
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With more than 2.2 million specimens representing all plant groups from around the world, the herbaria hold the largest collection of their kind at a U.S. public university. Visit on your own time to see these delicately preserved specimens, from marine algae to California flowers, or join a guided tour at 1 p.m. or 3 p.m.

Cal Café

Friday 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. |
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Saturday 8:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. |
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Stop by to celebrate Homecoming with complimentary refreshments. Cal Alumni Association members will receive a free Cal-themed souvenir. Visit alumni.berkeley.edu for more information about CAA.

Sponsored by: 
Cal Alumni Association

Charter Hill and Benjamin Ide Wheeler Hospitality Tent

Friday 9:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. |
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Saturday 9:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. |
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Members of the Charter Hill and Benjamin Ide Wheeler (BIW) Societies are invited to relax in a private hospitality tent. Stop by to enjoy refreshments, visit with students and fellow society members, and even charge your phone. Dedicated staff members can answer questions about your giving or participation in these philanthropic communities. Open exclusively to members of the Charter Hill (charterhill.berkeley.edu) and BIW (planyourlegacy.berkeley.edu) Societies.

The Charter Hill Society recognizes donors who make annual gifts totaling $1,000 or more to any school, college, or program at Berkeley. The BIW Society recognizes and thanks individuals who provide essential philanthropic support to Berkeley through planned gifts; life income plans; and beneficiary designations of retirement plans, brokerage accounts, or life insurance policies.

Homecoming Headquarters

Friday 9:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. |
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Saturday 8:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. |
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Stop off at Homecoming Headquarters when you first arrive to pick up your name tag. Your name tag admits you to faculty seminars, tours, and open houses, and provides golf cart service. If you are going straight to your reunion or Cal parents event on Friday, your name tag will be available at the door.

You can also relax and enjoy refreshments in the Bears Lounge while planning your day with the help of Cal staff and students.

Women's Tennis Cal Nike Invitational

Friday 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. |
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Saturday 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. |
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Sunday 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. |
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Free admission
Root for Cal women’s tennis at this exciting tournament in the newly renovated Hellman Tennis Complex.

Campus Walking Tour

Friday 10:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. |
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Friday 1:00 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. |
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Saturday 10:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. |
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Saturday 11:00 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. |
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Saturday 1:00 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. |
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Learn about campus architecture, history, and university life during these 90-minute walking tours led by knowledgeable student ambassadors.

Contextualizing Alcohol Use and Sexual Risk among Latino Migrant Day Laborers​

Friday 10:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m. |
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Learn how the harsh living and working conditions faced by Latino migrant day laborers allow for vulnerability to psychosocial and health problems. This talk will advance a theory of “structural vulnerability” to explain the production and reproduction of such problems. Funding for this research was provided by a major grant from the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism.

Speaker(s): 
Kurt Organista
Professor of Social Welfare

Organista has published scholarly articles, and edited and authored books on the physical and mental health of Latino populations. He conducts research on HIV prevention for Latino migrant laborers. Organista serves on the editorial board of several psychology and social work journals, has served on the Office of AIDS Research Advisory Council at the National Institutes of Health, and is vice chair of the San Francisco Foundation Board of Trustees.

Sponsored by: 
School of Social Welfare

Foods of the Americas (Exhibition & Family Day)

Friday 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. |
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Saturday 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. |
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Sunday 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. |
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View a colorful marketplace filled with produce domesticated by ancient farmers of the Americas, including corn, tomatoes, potatoes, beans, quinoa, and chocolate. A docent will be on hand to answer your questions. Appropriate for all ages.
Sponsored by: 
UC Botanical Garden

Morrison Library Open House

Friday 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. |
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Saturday 10:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. |
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Morrison Library opened in 1928 as a traditional reading room, providing a den-like setting for students to take a break from the rigors of academic life. One of the architectural treasures of the Berkeley campus, it offers comfortable seating for leisurely reading and maintains a circulating collection of newly published popular fiction and nonfiction.

Undergraduate Admissions at UC Berkeley

Friday 10:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m. |
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Get an overview of Berkeley admissions, including how new undergraduates are recruited, evaluated, and selected. Learn how Berkeley balances selective admissions and holistic review while fulfilling its mission as a public university.

Speaker(s): 
Greg Dubrow
Director of Research & Policy Analysis, Office of Undergraduate Admissions

Dubrow has been at Berkeley for more than 10 years, leading the analytical efforts for undergraduate admissions. Previously, he was an assistant professor of education policy at Florida International University in Miami. 

Your Brain on Stress — It's All About Plasticity

Friday 10:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m. |
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Psychological stress is a big part of modern life and, as we’ve all learned by now, it affects our bodies and brains. Discover the details during this talk: Is all stress bad for you? In what context can stress be beneficial for brain function? Can exposure to stress impact our vulnerability to develop mental illness? Daniela Kaufer will share findings from her lab about the plastic changes that occur in the brain in response to stress — and the consequences on mental, cognitive, and neurological function.

Speaker(s): 
Daniela Kaufer
Associate Professor, Integrative Biology and Helen Wills Neuroscience Institute; Class of 1943 Memorial Chair

Kaufer earned her Ph.D. from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and was a neurosurgery research fellow at Stanford. She is the recipient of the Bakar fellowship to study post-traumatic epilepsy and of the National Institute of Mental Health’s BRAINS (Biobehavioral Research Awards for Innovative New Scientists) award to study pathways that lead from early life stress to mental illness vulnerability.

Sponsored by: 
Prytanean Alumnae, Inc.

Plants of the World (Tours)

Friday 11:00 a.m. |
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Friday 12:30 p.m. |
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Friday 1:30 p.m. |
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Saturday 1:30 p.m. |
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Explore deserts, tropical forests, wetlands, and other diverse plant habitats from six continents. View special collections of orchids and carnivorous plants, and stroll through the Garden of Old Roses overlooking the Bay. Each tour is a unique experience focused on plants at their seasonal best and your interests.

Sponsored by: 
UC Botanical Garden

The Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life

Friday 11:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. |
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View a trio of exhibitions highlighting the treasures of one of the world’s preeminent Jewish collections in a university setting. “The Future of Memory” encourages exploration of the many approaches to history in the digital age. “Living by The Book” brings together scrolls, ritual objects, clothing, furniture, and memorabilia that express culture in biblical terms. “Larger than Life: Jonah and the Fish” reinterprets the Book of Jonah with etchings, aquatints, a wooden box, a fish net, and a representation of the giant fish that is equally comforting and uncanny.

UC Museum of Paleontology Tour

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The University of California Museum of Paleontology contains more than five million specimens: invertebrate fossils and microfossils; ancient North American mammals, crocodilians, turtles, marine reptiles; and even massive dinosaurs that once roamed Montana and California. In this exclusive, behind-the-scenes tour, learn why these collections are critical to understanding global change past and present. Limited to 25 people on a first-come, first-served basis.

Sponsored by: 
UC Museum of Paleontology

UCPD Open House

Friday 11:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. |
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Come see the University Police bomb squad vehicle, robot, and other equipment.  Demonstrations will take place near the UCPD Command Vehicle on Barrow Lane at the south side of Sproul Hall.

Comprehensive Excellence in Intercollegiate Athletics & Academics: Challenges and Successes at Berkeley

Friday 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. |
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Berkeley prides itself on comprehensive excellence in all endeavors — a high standard for our students to meet. In this seminar, we will discuss the current academic performance of our intercollegiate student-athletes, their challenges, and their successes.

Speaker(s): 
Bob Jacobsen
Professor of Physics; Faculty Athletic Representative to the NCAA; Interim Dean of Undergraduate Studies, Letters and Science; and Gary and Donna Freedman Chair in Undergraduate Education

Jacobsen recently taught Physics for Future Presidents and the upper-division physics major lab course.

Self-Compassion: Antecedents and Consequences for Growth and Self-Improvement

Friday 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. |
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The scientific study of self-compassion — approaching one’s own suffering with an attitude of kindness and nonjudgmental understanding — has flourished in recent years. Self-compassion is especially crucial when dealing with failure or rejection —  negative events that can lead to self-criticism. Learn about recent findings emerging from Serena Chen’s lab, touching on what promotes self-compassion and illuminating the consequences of self-compassion, particularly for personal growth and self-improvement.

Speaker(s): 
Serena Chen
Professor of Psychology; Marian E. and Daniel E. Koshland, Jr. Distinguished Chair for Innovative Teaching and Research

Chen is a fellow of the Society of Personality and Social Psychology, American Psychological Association, and the Association of Psychological Science. She received the Early Career Award from the International Society for Self and Identity, and the Distinguished Teaching Award from Berkeley’s Social Sciences division.

Sponsored by: 
College of Letters & Science

Suspect Race: Causes and Consequences of Biased Policing

Friday 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. |
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Recent episodes of police killings of unarmed black men highlight what is actually a longstanding and pervasive problem. Jack Glaser will describe the phenomenon of biased policing in America, highlighting psychological science research that explains the problem and offers prospective solutions. Learn about his research on the “reverse deterrent” effects of racial profiling and hear about policy and practice changes that could lead to more equitable law enforcement.

Speaker(s): 
Jack Glaser
Associate Professor and Associate Dean, Richard & Rhoda Goldman School of Public Policy

Glaser studies prejudice and discrimination as they operate at multiple levels, including “implicit” (unconscious) bias. He is working with law enforcement leaders, civil rights groups, and other stakeholders to address racial and ethnic bias in policing, including building a national database of police stops and use-of-force incidents. He is the author of the recently published Suspect Race: Causes and Consequences of Racial Profiling.

Sponsored by: 
Richard & Rhoda Goldman School of Public Policy

Cal Spirit Noon Rally

Friday 12:00 p.m. to 1:00 p.m. |
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Rev up your blue and gold pride at this lively, all-campus event featuring all of your favorite Cal Spirit groups!

Sponsored by: 
UC Rally Committee

Museum of Vertebrate Zoology Tour

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Visit one of the largest university-based collections of tetrapod vertebrates in the world, including about 700,000 superb bird, mammal, reptile, and amphibian specimens from around the globe. You’ll see rare and extinct animal specimens, and learn about research projects aimed at answering fundamental questions about evolution and conservation. Limited to 25 people on a first-come, first-served basis.

Sponsored by: 
Museum of Vertebrate Zoology

The 2015 Arleigh Williams Forum

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Join us for this annual public gathering presented by one of the campus’s most historic organizations, the Order of the Golden Bear. The Arleigh Williams Forum honors the memory of a standout Cal football player, U.S. Navy veteran, and campus administrator who regularly opened his doors for the campus community to engage in open dialogue. Hear Joseph D. Greenwell’s unique perspective on “Berkeley Life: Reflections on the Students’ Experience.” He will discuss some of the challenges that our students face, where our students flourish, and his hopes for enhancing Berkeley’s sense of community and belonging.

Speaker(s): 
Joseph D. Greenwell
Associate Vice Chancellor and Dean of Students

Greenwell serves all students with customized programs and services that support them from orientation through graduation and beyond. Greenwell joined Berkeley from San Francisco State University, where he served as dean of students. Passionate about the field of human development, he is currently enrolled in a doctorate of education program at Vanderbilt University’s Peabody College.

Sponsored by: 
The Order of the Golden Bear

How are Cal Band Formations Created?

Friday 2:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. |
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Two insiders provide a brief history of the Cal Band, including how field formations are conceptualized and charted. Learn how this is accomplished on arrangements ranging from traditional Cal songs to contemporary selections. Hint: it involves something called a “poop sheet”!

Speaker(s): 
Bob Calonico '76
Cal Band Director

Calonico has been teaching at Berkeley since 1990 and has served as director of UC Jazz Ensembles and director of bands since 1995. Next May, he will tour China and Japan with the Cal Marching Band.

Samuel Cappoli
Cal Band Drum Major

Cappoli hails from Southern California and will receive his bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering in 2016.

Sponsored by: 
Student Musical Activities

Mandarin-Language Campus Walking Tour

Friday 2:00 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. |
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Saturday 9:30 a.m. to 11:00 a.m. |
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Learn about campus architecture, history, and university life during a 90-minute walking tour with a knowledgeable Mandarin-speaking student ambassador.

Music as an Art and a Science: A Musician's Perspective

Friday 2:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. |
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Musical scholars tend to rely on carefully chosen words to lecture and write about music. Performers, especially those trained in the tradition of Western classical music, prefer to communicate fully and precisely by relying on carefully composed and performed notes, rhythms, and sonorities. Scholar-performers enjoy combining these complementary approaches. To what extent can artistic performances be instinctive and nonverbal, and to what extent can they be prepared intellectually and held up by the language of scientific discipline?

Speaker(s): 
Davitt Moroney Ph.D. '80
Professor of Music

Moroney joined Berkeley’s faculty in 2001 as a professor and University Organist, a position that specifically combines his activities as a scholar and performer. He specializes in music of the 16th to 18th centuries, in particular the works of J. S. Bach. He has concertized in many countries and made over 70 CD recordings. His monograph “Bach: An Extraordinary Life” (2000) has been translated into five languages.

Spanish-Language Campus Walking Tour

Friday 2:00 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. |
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Saturday 9:30 a.m. to 11:00 a.m. |
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Learn about campus architecture, history, and university life during a 90-minute walking tour with a knowledgeable Spanish-speaking student ambassador.

Essig Museum of Entomology Tour

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Explore the weird and wonderful world of insects and spiders at the Essig Museum, home to more than five million insect specimens collected over 100 years’ time from the western United States, Hawaii, Mexico, Costa Rica, and Tahiti. Learn how specimens are used to discover new species, decipher evolutionary questions, and understand where and how these creatures live. Friday’s tours are limited to 12 people per time slot.

Walking Tour of the Berkeley Bears

Friday 3:00 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. |
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Bears are everywhere you look at Berkeley, and that’s not just the students! There are more than 25 statues and other artworks on and near campus representing our beloved mascot. Join a student ambassador for this fun, bear hunt walking tour.

Neuroscience: Your Brain at Berkeley

Friday 3:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. |
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Neuroscience — the biological study of brain and behavior — is in an era of rapid discovery. Modern research is revealing how the brain develops, senses the world, computes, learns, controls movement, and performs many of the cognitive functions that make us human. Hear about recent discoveries made at Berkeley that give new insight into brain function and dysfunction in neurological disease.

Speaker(s): 
Dan Feldman
Associate Professor, Molecular & Cell Biology

Feldman earned his Ph.D. from Stanford University and did postdoctoral research at UCSF and at the National Institutes of Health. At Berkeley, his research laboratory studies the function of the brain’s cerebral cortex. In addition to undergraduate teaching, Feldman directs the neuroscience Ph.D. program.

Sponsored by: 
Letters & Science, Molecular & Cell Biology and Helen Wills Neuroscience Center

Technology and Human Rights

Friday 3:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. |
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Over the past decade, the United States has increasingly harnessed drone technology for various policy-related purposes, including targeted assassinations and surveillance. Hear Alexa Koenig describe how drones are being used both globally and at home. Explore some of the legal issues that have emerged from their use and the ways in which human rights actors are using new technologies to document and investigate the world’s most egregious crimes.

Speaker(s): 
Alexa Koenig Ph.D. '13
Executive Director, Human Rights Center, Berkeley Law

Koenig, who holds a J.D. in addition to her doctorate, has published research and commentary in such diverse outlets as the Annual Review of Law and Social Science and U.S. News and World Report. She is the coeditor of the forthcoming book, Extreme Punishment, and a co-author of the forthcoming Hiding in Plain Sight: The Pursuit of War Criminals from Nuremberg to the War on Terror. A member of the technology advisory board for the International Criminal Court, she is often called upon to speak about U.S. detention and drone policies as well as technology and human rights.

Sponsored by: 
Berkeley Law

Undergraduate Research and Cascading Mentorships: A Recipe for Scientific Excellence

Friday 3:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. |
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In Chelsea Specht’s lab, undergraduates pursue exciting research topics exploring the field of plant evolution. Hear about some of the intriguing projects they have conducted independently and in collaboration with graduate students and postdocs. You will learn how “cascading” mentorships, combined with support from programs like Sponsored Projects for Undergraduate Research (SPUR), generate outstanding research opportunities for undergrads and powerful experiences for mentors, ultimately creating a network of influential academic leaders, teachers, and researchers with a shared passion for education.

Speaker(s): 
Chelsea Specht
Associate Professor and Plant Organismal Biologist, Plant & Microbial Biology and Integrative Biology

Specht’s research focuses on the natural diversity of plants and seeks to better understand the forces creating and sustaining this diversity. Her work combines traditional morphological and developmental techniques with molecular genetics, comparative genomics, and evolutionary biology. She and her students take advantage of living and preserved collections in the Berkeley Natural History Museums to advance their research in plant systematics, biogeography, and developmental evolution.

Sponsored by: 
College of Natural Resources

Stars and Planets and Black Holes, Oh My!

Friday 5:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. |
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Lick Observatory, an iconic, 127-year-old research facility on Mt. Hamilton, is a vibrant base for the University of California’s astronomy education and outreach efforts. There, Berkeley students gain invaluable hands-on experience in cutting-edge fields such as stellar explosions, Earth-like planets orbiting other stars, and giant black holes. Learn about recent discoveries and how you can help sustain the observatory.

Speaker(s): 
Alex Filippenko
Professor of Astronomy; Richard and Rhoda Goldman Distinguished Chair in the Physical Sciences

Filippenko is one of the world’s most highly cited astronomers and an elected member of the National Academy of Sciences. He was the only person to have served on both teams that simultaneously discovered the accelerating expansion of the universe. Voted by Berkeley students as the “Best Professor” on campus a record nine times, he appears frequently on TV documentaries and is addicted to observing total solar eclipses (14 so far).

Sponsored by: 
College of Letters & Science

Reunion Volunteer Leadership Reception

Friday 5:30 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. |
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Each year, hundreds of alumni volunteers raise funds and do outreach for their class campaigns. This special, invitation-only reception thanks them for helping sustain Berkeley’s excellence.

Contact Tammy Spath at tspath@berkeley.edu for more information.

Sponsored by: 
Class Campaigns

Berkeley Hillel Parents and Alumni Shabbat

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Cal parents, has your student found a community at Berkeley Hillel? Alumni, do you miss hanging out with the awesome staff and enjoying free food? You’re invited to a special evening at Berkeley Hillel. Join us at 6 p.m. for conservative and reform services, followed by a free Shabbat dinner and dessert at 7 p.m.

Homecoming Rally

Friday 8:00 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. |
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The UC Rally Committee presents this showcase of student talent at Cal today featuring dance, cultural, and singing groups. Don’t miss special appearances by the Dance Team, Cheer Team, and, of course, the University of California Marching Band!

Sponsored by: 
UC Rally Committee

Mariinsky Ballet and Orchestra: Cinderella at Cal Performances

Friday 8:00 p.m. |
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Saturday 2:00 p.m. |
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Saturday 8:00 p.m. |
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Sunday 3:00 p.m. |
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Tickets start at $45. (calperformances.org)
The Mariinsky Ballet has been a bastion of arts excellence for more than two centuries. Enjoy one of the most celebrated works in the company’s repertoire, Alexei Ratmansky’s Cinderella. The production launched the choreographer to international stardom. This enchanting version of the fairytale draws its drama from the wellspring of Prokofiev’s glorious, bittersweet score performed by the unparalleled Mariinsky Orchestra.

California Lightweight Crew Association Alumni Day

Saturday 8:30 a.m. |
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The California Lightweight Crew Association and Cal Lightweight Crew invite Cal Crew Alumni to the boathouse at Jack London Square Aquatic Center for a morning of rowing, brunching, and catching up. At this invitation-only event — meet the team, take a ride in the launch with coaches, pick up some Cal Lightweight gear, and reconnect with your favorite Golden Bear rowers. Arrive by 9 a.m. if you’d like to row.

Living with Richard Pryor: A Biographer's Tale

Saturday 9:00 a.m. to 10:00 a.m. |
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To write a biography is to practice a sort of exorcism in which the spirits of the dead are brought, in thrilling ways, back to life. Biographer Scott Saul discusses his journey in researching and capturing the life of comedian-actor Richard Pryor — how he found secret histories behind the better-known public stories that circulated around Pryor during his moment of fame. Pryor has often been acknowledged — by figures ranging from Mel Brooks and Bob Newhart to Jerry Seinfeld and Chris Rock — as a comic genius, but Saul found that the nature and wellsprings of his genius had been misunderstood.

Speaker(s): 
Scott Saul
Professor, English

Saul is a historian and critic who has written for the New York Times, Harper’s Magazine, The Nation, and others. He is the author of the acclaimed biography Becoming Richard Pryor (described by Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist Michael Chabon as “a fascinating, exhilarating read”) and the creator of Richard Pryor’s Peoria, an online archive which brings to life Pryor’s formative years in the red-light district of Peoria, Illinois. He teaches courses in American literature and history at Berkeley.

Sponsored by: 
College of Letters & Science

University Library Book Sale

Saturday 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. |
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Expand your home library at the annual book sale in Doe Library. Hunt for treasures among thousands of hardback and soft-cover books for sale for just one dollar each!

Bear Affair Tailgate BBQ (sold out)

Saturday 10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. |
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Relax before the game at a traditional tailgate barbeque open to everyone. Price includes second helpings. Special seating area for Cal parents, each alumni class, and student group reunions.

Your ticket to this event also includes unlimited access to faculty seminars, tours, and open houses all weekend long.

College of Chemistry Breakfast

Saturday 10:00 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. |
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Join College of Chemistry alumni, students, parents, and friends for a continental breakfast prior to Professor David Schaffer’s faculty seminar, “Evolving New Synthetic Viruses: Sparking the Gene Therapy Revolution.”

Sponsored by: 
College of Chemistry

Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology Open House

Saturday 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. |
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Hear about the 8-foot-tall, 7,000-pound “Doctor” hailing from ancient Egypt, and master the art of writing your name in hieroglyphs with guidance from our expert staff. This fun and informative program features faculty “flash talks” describing the latest research from the field and updates on the 2016 reopening of the Hearst Museum following a redesign of its gallery and collections facilities.

The Peter E. Haas Public Service Award Presentation and Lecture

Saturday 10:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. |
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This event recognizes a Berkeley alumnus who has made a significant voluntary public contribution to the betterment of society within the U.S., particularly at the community level. This year’s recipient is James A. Kowalski, Jr. ’86, who is being honored for his pro bono service to victims of mortgage fraud and predatory lending and collection practices. His work — including the litigation of landmark foreclosure defense cases — has been instrumental in slowing down foreclosure filings nationwide.

Energy Policy in the US and Around the World

Saturday 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. |
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Catherine Wolfram will share her insights on some of today’s top energy policy issues. Join us for an illuminating discussion about climate change and efforts to reduce emissions from the energy sector, the link between energy and economic development, and the use of big data to inform energy policy.

Speaker(s): 
Catherine Wolfram
Faculty Director, Energy Institute; Cora Jane Flood Endowed Chair in the Walter A. Haas School of Business

Wolfram has been at Berkeley for 15 years and has twice been honored with the Earl F. Cheit Award for Excellence in Teaching. Her current research focuses on energy markets and environmental regulation. She is a faculty scientist in the environmental energy technologies division of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.

Sponsored by: 
Haas School of Business

Evolving New Synthetic Viruses: Sparking the Gene Therapy Revolution

Saturday 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. |
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Gene therapy has been increasingly successful in human clinical trials for rare diseases, but much better gene delivery vehicles are needed to expand these successes to the treatment of the majority of conditions. Learn about directed vector evolution, an exciting new technology used to create viruses specifically designed for more targeted delivery.

Speaker(s): 
David Schaffer
Professor of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Bioengineering, and Neuroscience

Schaffer’s postdoctoral research at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies was focused on neural stem cells and viral gene delivery vehicles. He joined the Berkeley campus in 1999 and holds a joint appointment with the Helen Wills Neuroscience Institute. He has been affiliated with the Berkeley Stem Cell Center since 2007 and currently serves as its director.

Sponsored by: 
College of Chemistry

The Jacobs Institute: At the Intersection of Design and Technology

Saturday 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. |
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Budding engineers, artists, and game-changers from many fields meet at the Jacobs Institute for Design Innovation to turn visionary ideas into designs to help improve the world. The new Jacobs Hall is home to the institute. With five design studios and the latest equipment for rapid prototyping and digital fabrication, it provides space and resources so students can learn by doing. Learn about the history and vision behind the institute and how design education will play a crucial role in our students’ futures.

Speaker(s): 
Björn Hartmann
Chief Technology Officer, Jacobs Institute and Associate Professor, Electrical Engineering & Computer Sciences

Hartmann received his Ph.D. in computer science from Stanford University in 2009. His research in human-computer interaction focuses on the creation and evaluation of user interface design tools, end-user programming environments, and ubiquitous computing tool kits. He co-founded the CITRIS Invention Lab, a precursor to the Jacobs Institute.

Sponsored by: 
College of Engineering

Water Policy & the Drought: Balancing Competing Interests to Stay Afloat

Saturday 10:30 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. |
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Scientists agree that California’s droughts are cyclical and appear to be growing worse. While we have developed technologies to address our water challenges, water policy remains a hot-button issue in the Golden State, and not necessarily on traditional Republican-Democratic policy lines. Along with the need for major new infrastructure, deep conflicts divide agricultural and urban industries, Central Valley and coastal communities, environmentalists and fracking proponents, and others. Join us for a timely discussion on how we can build consensus and create bipartisan solutions to ensure a sustainable water future for our state.

Speaker(s): 
Felicia Marcus
State Water Resources Control Board Chair

Marcus was appointed to the board in 2012 and designated as its chair in 2013 by Governor Jerry Brown. Her previous work spans the government, nonprofit, and private sectors. As Region IX administrator for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency during the Clinton administration, she was known for uniting unlikely allies to make environmental progress on a wide range of issues.

Mel Levine ’64
Counsel and former Partner, Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher LLP, Former U.S. Representative, 27th Congressional District

Levine is president of the Board of Commissioners of the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power. He served in Congress from 1983–93 and in the state Assembly from 1977–82. He is a member of the Goldman School of Public Policy’s Board of Advisors.

David L. Sedlak
Malozemoff Professor in Mineral Engineering, Co-director of Berkeley Water Center, and Director of Institute for Environmental Science and Engineering (IESE)

Sedlak’s research focuses on the fate of chemical contaminants, with the goal of developing cost-effective, safe, and sustainable systems to manage water resources. He is particularly interested in the development of local sources of water. He is the author of Water 4.0, which examines how we can gain insight into current water issues by understanding the history of urban water systems.

Richard “Dick” H. Beahrs '68
Moderator

Beahrs is a UC Berkeley Foundation trustee and a member of the Center on Civility & Democratic Engagement’s Advisory Board. Now retired, he spent 35 years as a media executive at Time Warner. Beahrs and his wife, Carolyn, funded the launch of the campus’s Beahrs Environmental Leadership Program, a multidisciplinary program that has trained over 400 environmental professionals from 90 countries in sustainable development skills.

Sponsored by: 
The Goldman School of Public Policy’s Center on Civility & Democratic Engagement

Campanile 100th Celebration

Saturday 11:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. |
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Join the campus in celebrating the 100th anniversary of our beloved Sather Tower, a.k.a the Campanile. The bells will play “Happy Birthday” to commemorate this historic occasion, and you’re invited to sing along — and enjoy a slice of birthday cake!

Feed the Bears Tour

Saturday 11:00 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. |
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Take a tour focusing on the university’s philanthropic history, including the programs and buildings made possible by private giving.

Bringing Design to Life: Digital Fabrication for All

Saturday 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. |
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Dive into the world of digital fabrication and prototyping with laser-cutters and 3D printers at the Jacobs Institute for Design Innovation. You’ll get inspired — and get your hands dirty — making a personalized souvenir with help from our team of technicians. No experience necessary; just bring your creativity and an open mind.

College of Chemistry Picnic

Saturday 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. |
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Join College of Chemistry alumni, students, parents, and friends for complimentary lunch on the plaza.

Sponsored by: 
College of Chemistry

College of Natural Resources Picnic

Saturday 11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. |
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Advance registration required
The CNR Alumni Association invites you to a picnic for all generations, including families with children. Enjoy delicious BBQ, farm-fresh produce, great company, and spirits compliments of CNR alumni.

Sponsored by: 
College of Natural Resources

Alumni Panel: Why Culture Matters

Saturday 12:00 p.m. to 1:00 p.m. |
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UC Berkeley is broadly recognized for its distinctive culture and values: how we view ourselves and how others view us shape the impact we have on our immediate communities and around the world. The Haas School of Business has its own robust culture, and in recent years the force behind all initiatives has been the school’s Defining Principles: Question the Status Quo, Confidence Without Attitude, Students Always, and Beyond Yourself. The principles guide and define the Berkeley-Haas community in all its endeavors, from admissions to alumni relations. Haas Dean Rich Lyons leads an alumni panel in a discussion on the invaluable space that culture occupies in an organization and a community.

Speaker(s): 
Rich Lyons '82
Dean, Haas School of Business

As an alumnus of the school’s undergraduate program, Lyons has deep ties to Berkeley-Haas. His teaching and research interests are in international finance and leadership. Over the years Lyons has received several teaching awards and in 1998 was honored with the Distinguished Teaching Award, Berkeley’s highest teaching honor. A signature achievement of Lyons’s tenure has been the establishment of the Defining Principles as the Haas School’s cultural cornerstone.

Sponsored by: 
Haas School of Business

KALX Open House and Tour

Saturday 12:00 p.m. to 2:00 p.m. |
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Celebrating more than 50 years of on-air magic, the mighty 90.7 FM invites you to enjoy a tour of the KALX studios and extensive music library, catch up with old friends, and share your fondest radio memories. Tours will be conducted on a drop-in basis, so stop by KALX any time!

Sponsored by: 
KALX

Unraveling the Quantum Ensemble

Saturday 12:00 p.m. to 1:00 p.m. |
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In the quantum world, an object can simultaneously exist in multiple states, the “dead” and “alive” condition of Schrödinger’s cat being a quintessential example. It is the act of measurement that drives such a superposition to a more familiar classical outcome — “dead” or “alive” for the cat — thus bridging the gap between quantum mechanics and our concept of reality. The precise nature of this wave function collapse, however, remains a topic of debate at the intersection of physics, mathematics, and philosophy. Recent experiments have reconstructed the real-time collapse of the wave function describing a two-state system, thereby filling in the details of this mysterious process.

Speaker(s): 
Irfan Siddiqi
Professor of Physics

Siddiqi’s experimental research group focuses on quantum effects in nanoscale circuits at temperatures near absolute zero. Siddiqi has won a number of awards, including the George E. Valley prize from the American Physical Society, and citations from several branches of the Department of Defense.

Sponsored by: 
College of Letters & Science

Cal vs. Washington State Homecoming Football Game

Saturday 1:00 p.m. |
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Cheer on your Golden Bears in the company of friends and family. Individual game tickets are sold separately through Cal Athletics: visit calbears.com/code and enter the appropriate code below to receive a ticket discount and special seating with your classmates or fellow Cal Parents.

Please note that students with season tickets have their own section. Students wishing to sit with their families will need to purchase additional tickets.

Cal Parents:
PARENTS2015

Reunion Classes:
REUNION1955
REUNION1960
REUNION1965
REUNION1970
REUNION1975
REUNION1980
REUNION1985
REUNION1990
REUNION1995
REUNION2000
REUNION2005

All other alumni and friends, or groups with mixed affiliations:
HOMECOMING

Essig Museum of Entomology Open House

Saturday 1:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. |
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Don’t miss this unique chance to view the weird and wonderful world of insects and spiders at the Essig Museum, home to more than five million insect specimens collected over 100 years’ time from western North America, Hawaii, Mexico, Costa Rica, and Tahiti. Learn how specimens are used to discover new species, decipher evolutionary questions, and understand where and how these creatures live. Check this listing for four tours on Friday with senior scientist Peter Oboyski. 

 
 

Mistresses of the Market: White Women and the Economy of Slavery in 19th Century America

Saturday 1:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. |
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Explore the experiences of white women who profited from commercial activities of 19th-century slave markets: those who bought and sold slaves within the market, those who worked alongside slave traders, and the working-class white women whose commercial activities brought them into collaboration with individuals who traded in human flesh. Learn how this work helped to sustain the slave market economy and contributed to the system’s perpetuation.

Speaker(s): 
Stephanie Jones-Rogers
Assistant Professor, History

In 2013, Jones-Rogers received the Lerner-Scott Prize for the best dissertation in U.S. women’s history from the Organization of American Historians. She is currently completing her book manuscript, a regional study that dramatically reshapes current understandings of white women’s economic relationships to slavery in the 19th-century South.

Sponsored by: 
College of Letters & Science

The Physics and Development of Beauty: Structural Colors in Butterflies

Saturday 1:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. |
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The colorful patterns of butterflies and moths serve such diverse functions as camouflage, warning coloration, and mimicry. These patterns are the result of the coloration of scales on the wings, and usually emanate from pigment molecules within the scales. Colors like blue and green, however, are often created by nanostructures of the scales that refract light to create color. Learn about emerging research that is revealing how these nanostructures are formed during the development of butterfly wings.

Speaker(s): 
Nipam Patel
Professor of Genetics, Genomics and Development, Molecular and Cell Biology and Integrative Biology; William V. Power Endowed Chair in Biology

Patel grew up in the West Texas town of El Paso and earned a Ph.D. in biology from Stanford University. Before coming to Berkeley, he was a staff associate in the Department of Embryology at the Carnegie Institution and a professor at the University of Chicago. He is coauthor of an undergraduate textbook on evolution and has taught the summertime embryology course at the Marine Biological Lab at Woods Hole for the past 15 years.

Sponsored by: 
Molecular and Cell Biology

Unleashing Science for a Sustainable Economy

Saturday 1:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. |
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Advances in biology and information technologies provide the foundation for a new renewable economy that can improve human well-being and environmental quality. David Zilberman’s research applies economics to the integration of multidisciplinary knowledge to identify the features of a renewable economy and suggest policies and institutions that will lead to its emergence. Gain insight into work that is addressing the challenges of biotechnology, biofuels, solar energy, and climate change.

Speaker(s): 
David Zilberman Ph.D. '79
Professor, Agricultural & Resource Economics

Zilberman is the faculty director of the Master of Development Practice and co-director of the Beahrs Environmental Leadership Program. He has advised governments, international organizations, and companies on issues of water, biotechnology, and environmental policy. He is also a frequent contributor to the Berkeley Blog.

Sponsored by: 
College of Natural Resources

The New and the Old: A Walking Tour of Campus

Saturday 2:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. |
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A student ambassador will be your guide around some of the campus’s newer buildings, those under construction, and a few long-beloved edifices.

Can We Eat Less and Live Longer?

Saturday 3:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. |
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Calorie restriction — reduced food intake without malnutrition — has been shown to markedly prolong lifespan in several animal species while delaying many age-related health disorders. Are these observations translatable to humans, a larger animal with a slower metabolism? Can dietary or medicinal interventions that don’t involve lifelong food deprivation mimic the benefits of calorie restriction? The metabolic response of animals, including humans, to nutrient deprivation is complex, finely orchestrated, and extremely successful at preserving critical lean tissue stores. Learn how the biology and health consequences of calorie restriction comprise some of the most remarkable observations in all of biomedical science.

Speaker(s): 
Marc Hellerstein
Professor of Nutritional Sciences & Toxicology; Dr. Robert C. and Veronica Atkins Chair in Metabolic Nutrition

Hellerstein joined the Berkeley faculty in 1987 after completing medical training at Yale Medical School and a Ph.D. from Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He maintains a joint appointment in the department of medicine at UC San Francisco. Hellerstein’s major research interest has been developing novel methods to enable a new branch of medicine: molecular kinetics, or flux medicine. This research in dynamic molecular systems has resulted in more than 250 publications, 80 issued patents, 40 biopharma research programs and participation on several editorial boards, including Science Translational Medicine. He co-founded a medical diagnostics and drug development biotech company, KineMed, Inc., in 2001, for which he is currently chief of the scientific advisory board.

Sponsored by: 
College of Natural Resources

Creativity is a Public Good: Working Across the Arts and Design at Berkeley

Saturday 3:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. |
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The arts and design cultivate our powers of expression while creating a bridge to our community. Join this launch of Berkeley’s Arts and Design Initiative and dream with us about its future. Hear about innovative projects developed on campus and in collaboration with our wider Bay Area arts community. We will consider the role of creative thinking and making in higher education, mindful of Berkeley’s distinctive public mission as well as the unique opportunity for artistic experimentation at a top research university.

Speaker(s): 
Shannon Jackson
Associate Vice Chancellor of the Arts and Design, Hadidi Chair of Rhetoric and of Theater, Dance, and Performance Studies

Jackson is connecting and fortifying the many departments, centers, presenting organizations, and laboratories devoted to the arts and design at Berkeley. She recently was named to this new leadership post. Jackson is a frequent speaker on the role of the arts in higher education and in movements for social justice.

International House Resident Host Family Information Session and Reception

Sunday 10:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m. |
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Discover the rewarding experience of participating in the Host Family Program at I-House! Former Host families and those wishing to learn more about the program encouraged to attend. Enjoy light refreshments as you hear remarkable stories of hospitality and friendship.

International House Networking Reception

Sunday 11:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. |
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Reconnect with fellow alumni and meet new residents.

Careers Across Cultures: Leveraging the International House Experience Alumni Panel and Champagne Brunch

Sunday 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. |
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Jason Patent, Ph.D., Director of the Center for Intercultural Leadership at I-House, will lead an engaging discussion with a panel of I-House alumni spanning various industries, generations, and viewpoints. The focus will be how best to leverage the I-House experience when crossing cultural boundaries in the workplace, to be as effective as possible in working together to address the world’s challenges. Savor custom crêpes at the buffet during the champagne brunch!

International House Open House and Kids’ Zone

Sunday 12:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. |
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Kids of all ages welcome at the Global Homecoming Open House and Kids’ Zone! Activities include face painting, caricatures, a photo booth, and art activities. Don’t miss the Resident Fashion Show at 1:00 p.m. and a tour of the newly renovated Dining Commons at 1:45 p.m. Refreshments provided.
 

International House Around the World Under the Dome

Sunday 2:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. |
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$10 per person, alumni and their guests; $20 per person, general public.

Taste your way across the globe with international fare and suggested wine and beer pairings for those 21 and over. Passports provided at the door to ensure you don’t miss a bite. Cultural etiquette tips included.

Cal Men's Soccer vs. Stanford

Sunday 4:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. |
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$10/adults; $5/seniors, youth, and Cal students.