Lectures & Learning Opportunities

Check back often as events will be added to the website frequently — right up until Homecoming weekend!

The Power Paradox: Moving Toward Healthier Human Hierarchies

Friday 10 a.m.11 a.m.  

Join Dacher Keltner, co-director of Berkeley’s Greater Good Science Center, for some insights into our very human drive to be in command of our world. In this talk he’ll share some research about how we get power, how it turns us into fools, and why we need to work together to address inequality and powerlessness.

Speaker(s): 
Dacher Keltner
Thomas and Ruth Ann Hornaday Professor of Psychology; Director, Berkeley Social Interaction Laboratory; Faculty Director, Greater Good Science Center

Dacher Keltner received his B.A. from UC Santa Barbara and Ph.D. from Stanford. He studies the evolution of human emotion and power, class, and inequality. His five books include The Power Paradox (just published) and Born to Be Good: The Science of a Meaningful Life, and he has participated on two scientific panels with the Dalai Lama.   
 

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Understanding the Nature of Gentrification and Displacement in the Bay Area

Friday 10 a.m.11 a.m.  

Gentrification, or the influx of capital and higher-income, higher-educated residents into working-class neighborhoods, has already transformed about 10% of Bay Area neighborhoods. Displacement, which happens when housing or other conditions actually force moves, is occurring in 48% of Bay Area neighborhoods. The area currently affected by displacement includes an almost equal proportion of low-income and moderate/high-income neighborhoods. Learn about how and why neighborhoods are changing around the Bay Area and what cities are doing to help stabilize communities.

Speaker(s): 
Miriam Zuk
Director, Center for Community Innovation, Department of City and Regional Planning

Miriam Zuk, Ph.D. is the director of the Urban Displacement Project at the Center for Community Innovation. She has 15 years of experience in the fields of environmental justice and equitable development. She also teaches research design and writing to graduate students in the Department of City and Regional Planning. 

Sponsored by: 
Class of 1976
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Unleash the Power of Prevention: Ensure Healthy Development for All Youth

Friday 10 a.m.11 a.m.  

Effective approaches are available to prevent mental, emotional, and behavioral problems in young people, but they are underused or selected, implemented, and monitored in haphazard and uncoordinated ways that may thwart their success. This seminar will describe Dr. Shapiro’s recent research findings and reveal how to build a prevention infrastructure in local communities that supports healthy development.

Speaker(s): 
Valerie Shapiro
Assistant Professor of Social Welfare

Valerie Shapiro earned her Ph.D. in social welfare from the University of Washington, her masters in social service management from Bryn Mawr, and her B.A. in psychology from Colgate University. Her research focuses on the use of community coalitions for health promotion and strength-based approaches to foster mental health and resilience in children.  She is the author of the Devereux Student Strengths Assessment, used to measure and monitor the development of social-emotional competence in children and youth.
 

Sponsored by: 
Prytanean Alumnae
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Beyond Skin Deep: Chemicals in Cosmetics and How they Impact our Health

Friday 11:30 a.m.12:30 p.m.  

More than 12,000 chemicals are used in the personal care products that we put on our bodies every day, but most have not been tested for long-term toxicity. Some of these chemicals are suspected hormone disrupters, which means they may mimic, block, or otherwise interfere with the natural hormones in our bodies. This talk will identify chemicals we are exposed to by many every-day products, what health concerns this raises, how to reduce exposure, and what regulatory steps are on the horizon.  

Speaker(s): 
Kim Harley
Associate Adjunct Professor, School of Public Health

Kim Harley is a professor of maternal and child health and Associate Director of the Center for Environmental Research and Children’s Health.  She studies exposure to and health effects of common hormone-disrupting chemicals, including pesticides on our food, flame retardants in our furniture, and chemicals found in plastics and consumer products.  Her work focuses on how prenatal and early-life exposure to these chemicals affects children’s health and may interfere with healthy brain development, the timing of puberty, the respiratory system, and metabolism. 
 

Sponsored by: 
School of Public Health
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Building Berkeley: Bernard Maybeck, John Galen Howard, Julia Morgan and the UC Berkeley Campus

Friday 11:30 a.m.12:30 p.m.  

Between 1900 and 1925, the University of California — enjoying the patronage of Phoebe Hearst — set about building the “Athens of the West,” a site of learning and of architectural achievement to rival the universities of Europe and the East Coast. This talk focuses on the 21st-century legacy of that ambitious building program.

Speaker(s): 
Margaretta M. Lovell
Jay D. McEvoy Jr. Professor of American Art and Architecture Professor of Art History and of American Studies

Margaretta Lovell is a cultural historian working at the intersection of history, art history, anthropology, and museology. She studies material culture, painting, architecture, and design of the 18th, 19th, 20th, and 21st centuries. She received her Ph.D. in american studies at Yale in 1980 (having been appointed to the art history faculty in 1978) and has taught as visiting professor in the history of art departments at Stanford, Harvard, and the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. Having taught at Berkeley since 1981, she has also held the Dittman Chair in American Studies at the College of William and Mary and the Ednah Root Curatorial Chair for American Art at the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco. 
 

Sponsored by: 
College of Letters & Science, Art History, and American Studies Program
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Digging Ancient Greece: Uncovering Social, Economic, and Religious Life

Friday 11:30 a.m.12:30 p.m.  

Learn about the current research of the Nemea Center for Classical Archaeology at three ancient sites in Greece: the Sanctuary of Zeus at Nemea, where a panhellenic festival of athletic events was held every two years from the Archaic to the Hellenistic period; the Late Bronze Age site of Mycenae, where craft production was entangled in the economic life of a major palatial center; and the site of Aidonia, which presents new challenges in a world of threatened cultural heritage as the story of a prehistoric community is being recovered from among looted and newly discovered tombs.

Speaker(s): 
Kim Shelton
Associate Professor of Classics and Director of the Nemea Center for Classical Archaeology

Kim Shelton has been at Cal for 11 years, teaching Greek archaeology, culture, and myth. She has been a field archaeologist for 27 years. She is currently directing three ongoing excavations in Greece where she also runs a summer field school for undergraduates. 

Sponsored by: 
College of Letters & Science, Classics, and the Nemea Center for Classical Archaeology
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Oski Bear and the Struggles of Being a 75th-Year Sophomore

Friday 1:15 p.m.2:30 p.m.  

Join us for the 2016 Arleigh Williams Forum, an annual public gathering presented by one of the campus’s most historic organizations, the Order of the Golden Bear. The Arleigh Williams Forum honors the memory of a standout Cal football player, U.S. Navy veteran, and campus administrator who regularly opened his doors for the campus community to engage in frank and open dialogue.  Learn about Oski’s origins, incarnations, love life, notoriety, and the challenges facing a traditional school mascot on an ever-evolving, 21st-century college campus.

Speaker(s): 
Mal Pacheco
Former Oski Handler and current Cal Athletics Adviser
Sponsored by: 
Order of the Golden Bear
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Building Better Knees: Load Bearing Devices that Carry their Weight

Friday 2 p.m.3 p.m.  

This seminar will focus on the design of load-bearing medical devices for long-term structural integrity. Emphasis will be placed on materials selection and design evolution in implants for use in hips, knees, and shoulders. Topics will include material selection, design methodology, and mechanical characterization of medical devices. Various case studies will be presented.

Speaker(s): 
Lisa Pruitt
Lawrence Talbot Professor of Mechanical Engineering

Lisa Pruitt is the Lawrence Talbot Professor of Mechanical Engineering. She serves as the director of the Medical Polymer Group and specializes in the characterization of materials for use in load-bearing medical devices with special emphasis on orthopedics. She holds a Ph.D. in Engineering from Brown University. She received the UC Berkeley Distinguished Teaching Award in 2016.

Sponsored by: 
College of Engineering, Mechanical Engineering and Bioengineering
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The State of UC Berkeley Student Life

Friday 2 p.m.3 p.m.  

Join an interactive conversation with University professionals discussing the state of Berkeley Student Life with a focus on student career development, service learning, campus engagement, and advocacy. Come learn about the many resources available to students today and how you as alumni and parents can partner with us to address challenges faced in each of these important areas of a student’s experience.  As part of the program, you will have the opportunity to meet campus officials from the Dean of Students Office, Career Center, ASUC Student Union, Public Services Center and Center for Student Conduct.  

Speaker(s): 
Daryl Ansel
Associate Dean of Students and Executive Director, ASUC Student Union

Daryl Ansel (’83) served as Chief Operating Officer of the LA Kitchen and director of food services at UCLA before coming to Berkeley. He holds a master’s degree in hospitality management from Cornell University. 

Sandra Bass
Assistant Dean of Students and Director, Public Service Center

Sandra Bass works with students, faculty, and communities to promote and catalyze transformative and sustainable social change. Before coming to Berkeley, she was an assistant professor of criminology and political science at the University of Maryland, College Park. In 2002 Sandra joined the David and Lucile Packard Foundation and in 2009 she was selected to lead the foundation’s girl’s education, women’s leadership, and reproductive health program in Sub-Saharan Africa.

Brian Guerrero
Senior Associate Director, Cal Career Center

Brian Guerrero came to Berkeley after serving as the Deputy Director of Student Affairs Administration and Associate Director of Industry Relations within the Division of Student Affairs at UCLA. Previously he worked in Career Services at New York University, both at the NYC campus and creating their career center in Abu Dhabi. He holds a B.A. in Rhetoric and Political Communication from San Francisco State University and a M.A. in Higher Education Administration from New York University. He recently received his Doctorate of Education from the University of Southern California (USC).

Joseph D. Greenwell
Associate Vice Chancellor and Dean of Students

Joseph Greenwell serves all students with customized programs and services that support them from orientation through graduation and beyond. Greenwell joined Berkeley from San Francisco State University, where he served as dean of students. Passionate about the field of human development, he is currently enrolled in a doctorate of education program at Vanderbilt University’s Peabody College.

Hallie Hunt
Assistant Dean of Students and Director, Center for Student Conduct

Hallie Hunt served as assistant director of student conduct and academic integrity programs at UC Riverside and associate dean of students and director of student life at the SF Art Institute before taking on her current role at Berkeley.

David Surratt
Associate Dean of Students

David Surratt stepped into his current role at Berkeley in 2013. His previous roles include service as interim dean of students at Berkeley and dean of students at Rosemont College.

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UC Berkeley's History, Spirit, and Traditions

Friday 2 p.m.3 p.m.  

Delve into the history of UC Berkeley from its founding to the current era. This will be more than a repetition of the facts: we’ll discuss the most important moments of the university’s narrative and why they matter. Expect deep insights into such topics as Sather Tower, the California Golden Bears football team, and even our mascot, Oski!

Sponsored by: 
UC Rally Committee
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Why Don't Refugees Fly?

Friday 2 p.m.3 p.m.  

The global refugee crisis of 2016 is unparalleled. Sixty million people have been forced from their homes and, of these, 21 million have fled their homeland. More than a million sought refuge in Europe last year, with over 50,000 more arriving in the dead of winter an many more expected in the years to come. Refugees must face death and danger in seeking refuge even where asylum is granted. What are the challenges faced by host countries who are required by law to accept them? Learn about the current state of the refugee issue in Europe after the settlement with Turkey, which has blocked refugees from crossing the Aegean into Greece.

Speaker(s): 
Beverly Crawford Ames
Professor Emerita, Political Science

Beverly Crawford Ames is the former Director of Berkeley’s Center for German and European Studies. She teaches courses on theories of international political economy, American foreign policy, international law, ethnic and religious conflict, and global conflict and the refugee crisis. She has written policy papers, articles, and co-edited book on the causes of cultural conflict. Most recently she received fellowships from the Turkish National Science Foundation and from the European Commission to study the demographics of the refugee crisis in Turkey and Europe. She has lectured on the global refugee crisis at a number of universities across the country, at The Long Now in San Francisco, and appeared on KALW’s Philosophy Talk to discuss the crisis. 

Sponsored by: 
College of Letters & Science, Political Science and International & Area Studies, Political Economy
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Expanding Your Student's Horizon with Berkeley Study Abroad

Friday 3:30 p.m.4:30 p.m.  

Prepare to travel the world as we explore the wide range of program options available for Berkeley students interested in studying abroad. Discover how to plan for such an adventure while meeting, and even furthering, academic and career goals.

Speaker(s): 
Barbara Tassielli
Assistant Director of Advising, Berkeley Study Abroad

Working in study abroad at UC Berkeley for 25 years, Barbara has witnessed vast changes in the options that Berkeley students have available to them. She studied abroad as a Berkeley undergraduate in England at University of Leeds for a year through the UC Education Abroad Program (UCEAP). She has traveled to more than 20 countries worldwide and enjoys managing the activities of the Advising Office in Stephens Hall.

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From Cro Magnon to Couch Potato: Why Human Evolution Matters

Friday 3:30 p.m.4:30 p.m.  

Everything we do as humans — from chewing food to landing on the moon — we do because of the biological processes that have been refined over millions and millions of years of evolution. This talk explores what insights our evolutionary history might bring as we deal with the challenges that are shaping our future, including rapid climate change, the unprecedented ease of global travel, culture clashes, and an increasing number of sedentary occupations.

Speaker(s): 
Leslea Hlusko
Associate Professor, Integrative Biology

Leslea Hlusko’s research explores how genes influence primate skeletal variation and how that has evolved through time. This entails laboratory work focused on quantitative genetics and statistical analyses of variation. For the paleontological research, she spends a lot of time in eastern Africa looking for new fossils. She holds a B.A. from the University of Virginia and earned her M.A. and Ph.D. from Penn State University. She has been on the faculty at UC Berkeley since 2004 and earned the American Cultures Innovation in Teaching Award in 2014. 

Sponsored by: 
College of Letters & Science, Integrative Biology
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How to Convince Conservatives and Liberals Alike that Global Warming has a Human Cause

Friday 3:30 p.m.4:30 p.m.  

Professor Michael Ranney’s Reasoning Research Group has repeatedly shown that conservatives and liberals alike increase their acceptance that climate change is both occurring and human-caused after they view brief, well-crafted “bits” of scientific information.  These mini-intervention bits include videos, compelling statistics, temperature graphs, and mechanistic explanatory texts (see HowGlobalWarmingWorks.org for examples). Information about scientists’ non-bias, as well as how global warming can be inhibited inexpensively, may prove similarly compelling.  As the November election nears, Professor Ranney’s group’s convincing information (and perhaps even a haiku he’s written) may help Americans make better decisions about which candidates and policies to support.

Speaker(s): 
Michael Andrew Ranney
Professor of Education, Psychology, and Cognitive Science

Michael Ranney joined UC Berkeley after serving as a post-doctoral fellow at Princeton’s Cognitive Science Laboratory. He holds a Ph.D. and an M.S. in experimental cognitive psychology and undergraduate degrees in microbiology (molecular/cellular/developmental biology) and psychology. Professor Ranney’s research seeks to foster the public’s capacity to process challenging information –– lately focusing on global climate change.  He designs curricula, methods, and software to improve rational thinking and offers simple, potent, public-policy-relevant representations (see HowGlobalWarmingWorks.org). At Berkeley, he is head of the Reasoning Research Group, is past chair of SESAME (the Graduate Group in Science and Mathematics Education), and serves on the faculty of several departments, including education and psychology, and institutes including the Institute of Personality and Social Research (IPSR), and the Institute for Cognitive and Brain Sciences (ICBS). 
 

Sponsored by: 
Graduate School of Education
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Using Words as Windows onto Thought

Friday 3:30 p.m.4:30 p.m.  

Words rarely have just one meaning. For example, “chicken” can refer to an animal or meat, “glass” to an object or a material, and “long” to distance or time. Explore how this aspect of language provides insight into the mind through studies of cross-linguistic variation, historical language evolution, and language development in children.

Speaker(s): 
Mahesh Srinivasan
Assistant Professor, Psychology

Mahesh Srinivasan is a member of the Cognitive Science Faculty. He received his Ph.D. in developmental psychology from Harvard University in 2011. He directs the Language and Cognitive Development Laboratory, which uses empirical methods to explore how linguistic, cognitive, and social abilities arise and interact with one another during human development and across different cultures. His work has been published in numerous journals, and is supported by the National Science Foundation. 

Sponsored by: 
College of Letters & Science, Psychology
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