School & College Events

Check back often as events will be added to the website frequently — right up until Homecoming weekend!

Fire in Western U.S. Forests: Friend or Foe?

10/16/20 11:30 a.m.12:30 p.m.  

Wildfires are becoming increasingly common, especially in California where they have devastated many communities and ecosystems across the state. Professor Scott Stephens outlines the science behind their increasing frequency and discusses strategies that can enhance the resilience of California’s forests.

Speaker(s): 
Scott Stephens
Professor of Fire Science, Department of Environmental Science, Policy & Management


Professor Stephens is a leading expert on fire science and director of the UCB Center for Fire Research and Outreach. Stephens’ research expertise and interests include fire management, forest ecosystems, and fire ecology. He is interested in the interactions of wildland fire and ecosystems, which includes how prehistoric fires once interacted with ecosystems, how current wildland fires are affecting ecosystems, and how future fires, changing climates, and management may change this interaction. Stephens also is interested in forest and fire policy and how it can be improved to meet the challenges of the next decades, both in the United States and internationally.

Sponsored by: 
Rausser College of Natural Resources
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UC Research Should Be Free to All: COVID-19 Shows Us Why

10/16/20 11:30 a.m.12:30 p.m.  

The University of California has long believed that its research should be free for all to access. A world without barriers to knowledge promotes progress — including in the critically important fields of healthcare and medicine — and maximizes the impact of research. Since the pandemic struck, research on the novel coronavirus has been shared freely worldwide. In this panel discussion, Britt Glaunsinger, professor and researcher who specializes in viruses, Jeff MacKie-Mason, university librarian and professor, and Randy Schekman, Nobel Laureate and professor, explain why we should never go back to our old ways of scientific publishing.

Speaker(s): 
Britt Glaunsinger
Professor, Plant and Microbial Biology and Molecular and Cellular Biology


Glaunsinger is a UC Berkeley professor in the Department of Plant & Microbial Biology and the Department of Molecular & Cellular Biology and is also a Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator.

Jeff MacKie-Mason
University Librarian; Chief Digital Scholarship Officer; and Professor, Economics and Information


MacKie-Mason is UC Berkeley’s university librarian, chief digital scholarship officer, and a professor of economics and information. He is co-chair of the UC-wide task force that negotiates with academic publishers.

Randy Schekman
Professor, Cell and Developmental Biology and Investigator, Howard Hughes Medical Institute


Schekman is a UC Berkeley professor of cell and developmental biology, a Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator, and recipient of the 2013 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine.

Rachael Samberg (Moderator)
Scholarly Communication Officer, UC Berkeley Library


Samberg leads the UC Berkeley Library’s Office of Scholarly Communication Services, which helps scholars navigate the shifting publishing, intellectual property, and information policy landscapes.

Sponsored by: 
UC Berkeley Library
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Social Safety Net Crisis: Lessons from a Pandemic

10/16/20 1 p.m.2 p.m.  

Join Assistant Professor Tina Sacks as she discusses the country’s social safety net that is made up of various programs to assist low-income Americans and the importance of these programs in light of the current pandemic. A Q&A session will follow this presentation.

Speaker(s): 
Tina K. Sacks
Assistant Professor, School of Social Welfare


Sacks is assistant professor at Berkeley Social Welfare. Her fields of interest include racial inequities in health; social determinants of health; and poverty and inequality. Her current projects include gender dynamics and Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program enrollment among immigrant families in California.

Sponsored by: 
School of Social Welfare
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The Intersection of Industrial and Indigenous Forest Management

10/16/20 4:30 p.m.6 p.m.  

This 2020 S.J. Hall Lecture in Industrial Forestry will examine the intersection of industrial and indigenous forest management in California and across the United States. Peter Wakeland will moderate, and Tim Hayden, Dr. Mike Dockry, and Dawn Blake will discuss the aspects of successful and profitable forest management on tribal lands. The program will highlight the unique elements of tribal forest management, explore challenges faced by tribes managing forestland, and identify industrial forest management practices unique to tribal forestry that may have applications beyond tribal forest lands.

Speaker(s): 
Peter Wakeland (Moderator)
Acting Superintendent, Puget Sound Agency, Bureau of Indian Affairs; Chief, Forestry and Wildland Fire Management Division, Bureau of Indian Affairs; Member of the Confederated Tribes of the Grand Ronde


Wakeland has been the chief forester with the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) since 2016, recently accepting a special assignment as acting superintendent of the Puget Sound Agency. Prior to joining the BIA, Wakeland was the Coquille Indian Tribe’s natural resources director. Wakeland is a member of the Grand Ronde Tribe and was the first-ever recipient of the tribe’s Hatfield fellowship. He is a graduate of Oregon State University’s forest management program.

Tim Hayden
Executive Deputy Director, Natural Resources Division, Yurok Tribe; Member of the El Dorado County Wopumnes Nisenan-Mewuk Tribe


Hayden has been the deputy executive director of natural resources for the Yurok Tribe since 2015, having started his career in the tribe’s Fisheries Department nearly 25 years ago. He currently oversees all Yurok natural resources departments and programs and leads tribal efforts on resource management planning, environmental compliance, and carbon project management on recently purchased Yurok lands. Hayden serves on the Cal Fire Native American Advisory Committee and was recently selected to serve on the California Air Resources Board’s Carbon Offsets Taskforce. Hayden holds a B.S. from Humboldt State University’s Fisheries Department.

Mike Dockry
Assistant Professor, Department of Forest Resources, University of Minnesota; Member of the Citizen Potawatomi Nation


Dockry is a member of the Citizen Potawatomi Nation. He works at the University of Minnesota as an assistant professor of tribal natural resource management in the Department of Forest Resources, an affiliate faculty member in the American Indian Studies Department, and as a fellow at the Institute on the Environment. His academic focus is on incorporating Indigenous knowledge into forestry and natural resource management, supporting tribal sovereignty, and addressing tribal environmental issues. Dockry earned a B.S. and Ph.D. in Forestry from the University of Wisconsin and an M.S. in Forest Resources from Penn State University.

Dawn Blake
Wildlife Biologist, Hoopa Valley Tribe; Member of the Hoopa Valley Tribe


Blake has worked for over a decade in the Hoopa Valley Tribe’s forestry program. She is currently the tribe’s wildlife biologist II and continues to work directly with tribal forest managers on the timber sale process. She recently completed a master of science program in wildlife at Humboldt State University. Her work focused on the movements and habitat selection of pileated woodpeckers on the Hoopa Valley Reservation in response to timber management practices. Blake also sits on the board of directors of the Hoopa Tribal Education Association.

Sponsored by: 
Rausser College of Natural Resources
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Engineering Homecoming Kickoff

10/17/20 9 a.m.10 a.m.  

Engineering alums, students, parents, and friends are invited to join us for an informal conversation with our college deans, student advisers, and fellow members of the Berkeley Engineering community. We hope to see you!

Sponsored by: 
College of Engineering
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Mediating Investor Attention

10/17/20 10 a.m.11 a.m.  

Discover how media coverage, psychological biases, and decision heuristics affect the trading of individual investors. Professor Terrance Odean outlines new research that shows individual investors tend to trade too frequently, hold onto their losing investments, and buy stocks that are in the news. Mutual fund investors pay too much attention to past returns and too little to expenses. And investors’ excitement contributes to asset pricing bubbles. Excessive trading and return chasing with too little attention to fees materially lower investment returns and welfare.

Speaker(s): 
Terrance Odean
Rudd Family Foundation Professor of Finance


Odean is an advisory editor of the Financial Planning Review, a member of the editorial advisory board for the Journal of Investment Consulting and the Russell Sage Behavioral Economics Roundtable, and is an expert panelist for the Wall Street Journal. In 2016, he received the James R. Vertin Award from the CFA Institute for his research notable for its relevance and enduring value to investment professionals.

Sponsored by: 
Haas School of Business
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Meet Dean of CED Vishaan Chakrabarti

10/17/20 10 a.m.10:45 a.m.  

Vishaan Chakrabarti, the new dean of the College of Environmental Design (CED), will discuss his vision for the school. Renee Y. Chow, chair of architecture, joins him to talk about how CED plans to continue forging new urban visions for a sustainable future. A Q&A will follow the discussion. Advance registration in Zoom will be required to attend this event. One week prior to this event, a registration link will be provided.

Speaker(s): 
Vishaan Chakrabarti
Dean, College of Environmental Design


An alum of UC Berkeley’s College of Environmental Design (M.Arch. ’96), Chakrabarti founded the Practice for Architecture and Urbanism in 2015. He served as director of the New York City Department of City Planning from 2002 to 2005, overseeing planning and development during the period that followed the September 11 attacks. He holds a master’s degree in city planning from MIT and dual bachelor’s degrees in art history and engineering from Cornell. He is a Fellow of the American Institute of Architects.

Sponsored by: 
College of Environmental Design
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Q&A with College of Chemistry Undergraduate Dean

10/17/20 10 a.m.11:15 a.m.  

John Arnold, undergraduate dean at the College of Chemistry, will offer an update on undergraduate studies at the college and answer questions from the audience. This session will be interactive! Bring your questions, or submit them in advance by emailing CoC_relations@berkeley.edu. Please register in advance for this session through the College of Chemistry.

Sponsored by: 
College of Chemistry
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Rising to the Challenge: Berkeley Engineers Take on COVID-19

10/17/20 10 a.m.11 a.m.  

Berkeley Engineering faculty members have mustered a remarkable research response to COVID-19, and work continues around-the-clock. Join Dean Tsu-Jae King Liu and fellow engineering faculty from across the college and learn about the work being done in service to society.

Speaker(s): 
Tsu-Jae King Liu
Dean and Roy W. Carlson Professor of Engineering, Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences


Dean Liu is internationally recognized in academia and industry for her innovations in semiconductor devices and technology and highly regarded for achievements as an instructor, mentor, and administrator.

Patrick Hsu
Assistant Professor, Bioengineering


As a member of the Innovative Genomics Institute, Professor Hsu is working to apply new CRISPR tools he has discovered to provide a faster and better diagnosis of COVID-19 infection. The research also involves searching for new drug targets using CRISPR genetic screens.

Simo Mäkiharju
Assistant Professor, Mechanical Engineering


Professor Mäkiharju is collaborating to adapt sleep apnea machines to give respiratory aid to COVID-19 patients and is studying the droplet transport of infectious diseases.

Sponsored by: 
College of Engineering
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An Election Like No Other: Ensuring Democracy’s Survival

10/17/20 11:30 a.m.12:30 p.m.  

This panel will gather leaders and experts to address these unprecedented times and all the challenges confronting the 2020 election. What can we do to make voters’ voices heard during a pandemic and a historic civil rights upheaval?

Speaker(s): 
Aimee Allison
Founder and President, She the People


As founder and president of She the People, a national network elevating the voice and power of women of color, Allison brings together voters, organizers, and elected leaders in a movement grounded in values of love, justice, belonging, and democracy. Allison leads national efforts to build inclusive, multiracial coalitions led by women of color. She leverages media, research, and analysis to increase voter engagement and advocate for racial, economic, and gender justice. She holds a B.A. and M.A. from Stanford University and is the author of Army of None.

Bertrall Ross
Chancellor’s Professor of Law


Ross’s areas of expertise are voting rights and marginalized communities. His research interests are driven by a normative concern about democratic responsiveness and a methodological approach that integrates political theory and empirical social science into discussions of legal doctrine, the institutional role of courts, and democratic design. In the area of legislation, Ross’s current research seeks to address how courts should reconcile legislative supremacy with the vexing problem of interpreting statutes in contexts not foreseen by the enacting legislature. In election law, he is examining the constitutional dimensions and the structural sources of the marginalization of the poor in the American political process.

James Schwab
Chief Deputy Secretary of State, Policy and Planning. State of California


Schwab is the chief deputy secretary of state for policy and planning for California Secretary of State Alex Padilla, where he oversees implementation of recent election reforms. Schwab previously served as chief of legislative affairs where he managed the agency’s legislative agenda and monitored state and congressional legislative proposals. Schwab has also worked in Sacramento as a legislative staffer for several years. In addition to his state service, he has also managed the field campaigns of several legislative and city council races in Sacramento County. He holds a bachelor’s degree in international relations and affairs from the UC Davis.

John Swartzberg M.D.
Clinical Professor Emeritus, School of Public Health


Swartzberg is a clinical professor emeritus at Berkeley Public Health and chairs the editorial board of the school’s health and wellness publications. He is a past director of the UC Berkeley-UCSF Joint Medical Program, where he continues to teach. He is board certified in internal medicine and infectious diseases. Before joining UC Berkeley’s faculty (part time since 1980 and full time since 2001), he spent 30 years in clinical practice. He is also the hospital epidemiologist and chair of the Infection Control Committee at the Alta Bates Medical Center in Berkeley.

Sponsored by: 
Center on Civility & Democratic Engagement and Goldman School of Public Policy
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Measuring Brand Equity: Inside the Mind of the Consumer

10/17/20 11:30 a.m.12:30 p.m.  

Find out about breakthroughs in the neuroscience of consumer choice in this intriguing talk. Brands are often seen as one of the most valuable assets for firms. Yet the answer to “How much is a brand worth?” is surprisingly elusive. As one writer puts it, “Perhaps the only thing that has not been reached with regard to brand equity is a conclusion.” Associate Professor Ming Hsu outlines a new model that shows how and why standard customer-based brand equity measures systematically understate the brand value of (especially) well-known firms. 

Speaker(s): 
Ming Hsu
William Halford Jr. Family Chair, Marketing; Associate Professor, Business Administration


Hsu is an associate professor at UC Berkeley. He holds appointments in the Haas School of Business and the Helen Wills Neuroscience Institute. Hsu’s research involves using neuroscientific and computational tools to understand the biological basis of economic and consumer decision-making and how brain-based methods can be used to generate and validate insights into customers’ thoughts, feelings, and behavior. Prior to joining Berkeley, he was assistant professor of economics and neuroscience at University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Sponsored by: 
Haas School of Business
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Putting the ‘f’ in Chemistry

10/17/20 11:30 a.m.12:30 p.m.  

Professor Polly L. Arnold discusses the subtleties of structure and bonding in compounds of the f-block elements, the rare earth metals and their heavier congeners, uranium, and the actinides are still poorly understood. Our research to make new, exotic molecules from these metals contributes to our fundamental understanding of them. Rare earth metals are important as they are employed in various technologies, and researching safe, long-term handling of our nuclear waste legacies is critical. Another factor that slows our creativity and progress is the failure to include female and minority scientists. Find out what we’re doing to change the research ecosystem and improve STEM diversity.

Speaker(s): 
Polly L. Arnold
Professor, Chemistry and Chemical Sciences Division Director, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory


Arnold joined the UC Berkeley faculty as a professor in January 2020 and is the new director of the Chemical Sciences Division at Berkeley Labs. Prior to her arrival at Berkeley, Arnold was the Crum Brown Chair of Chemistry at the University of Edinburgh. She holds degrees from the University of Oxford and University of Sussex and was a Fulbright postdoctoral fellow at MIT. She is the fifth-youngest woman to be elected to the fellowship of the Royal Society and was appointed to the Order of the British Empire in 2017 for services to chemistry and women in STEM.

Sponsored by: 
College of Chemistry
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A Firm Foothold for Economic and Social Welfare

10/17/20 2:30 p.m.3:30 p.m.  

Find out how leading social welfare scholar Dr. Neung-hoo Park is shaping overall welfare policies covering labor, social services, and the environment in the Republic of Korea. Policies for what he calls an “inclusive welfare state” are based on equality of opportunity and public responsibility for vulnerable population groups. He discusses financial support and infrastructure expansion needed to support the economic and social well-being of citizens. He also outlines three principles of Korea’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic: openness, transparency, and democracy.

Speaker(s): 
Dr. Neung-hoo Park
Minister of Health and Welfare, Republic of Korea


Park is minister of health and welfare of the Republic of Korea. He has dedicated himself to developing social welfare research and policy in Korea as a scholar and a member of various policy committees. As minister, he has come up with measures to secure a firm foothold for an inclusive welfare state.

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